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Consultation on Divorce

Things To Do Before You File For a Divorce

1. Hire a Good Divorce Attorney:-

 Interview at least three divorce attorneys before you decide on one. Go with an attorney who has at least 5-10 years experience practicing family and divorce law. It is easier and less expensive if you and your spouse are able to settle all issues without litigation. If that can’t be done make sure you have an attorney who is capable and willing to litigate your case before a judge. You are basically looking for two things…an attorney who knows the value of settling quickly but is also willing to fight for you should the need arise.

2. Get an Idea of Where You Stand Financially:-

You need a clear picture of where you and your spouse stand financially. One of the primary goals of the divorce process is the make an equitable distribution of marital assets and debts. In order to get your fair share during divorce settlement negotiations it is imperative that you know what is owned and what is owed. This is a two-step process:

Determine what you own:– Some marital assets are obvious. It is clear that the marital home, any financial accounts and vehicles are assets that should be split equitably. Other not so obvious assets may include artwork, pension plans, inheritances or belongings brought into the marriage.

Determine what you owe:– When determining what you owe it does not matter whose name any debts are in. Marital debt will be split based on who is more financially able to pay the debt, not by whose name the debt is in. The easiest way to determine marital debt is to get a copy of your credit report. Any debt you have will be listed on your report.

3. Gather Proof of Income:-

You need documentation showing your income and the income of your spouse. If you and your spouse are salaried employees, you will need a copy of the most recent pay stubs plus your most resent Income Tax Return.

Determining income is difficult if your spouse is self-employed. In such a case, copies of bank account statements and financial business statements will give a clear picture of income. It is a good idea to make copies of such statements before filing for divorce.

You may be able to get an idea of how much your spouse actually makes but, it can be almost impossible to determine true income when a spouse is self-employed. Gather what information you can and then your attorney can help get the rest through the discovery process.

4. Make a Post-Divorce Budget:-

This is the fun part, figuring out your post-divorce budget. The part where you get to determine what you will have to live on once you are divorced. You are aware of what it takes to run the household now. What you need to know is what your costs of living will be after the divorce. Some people’s incomes drop drastically after divorce. Its best you be prepared by building a budget now instead of being hit over the head with bills you can’t pay.

You will have to estimate some expenses but it is important so that you can have some idea of what you will need to survive in your new life. It is also important because it will influence how you negotiate your divorce settlement. You need to know what you will need financially in order to evaluate your settlement options or what you may ask for should your case go to court.

5. Establish Credit in Your Own Name:-

If you don’t have any credit in your name alone you should establish some now. You can do this by obtaining a credit card but remember you want a card that is in your name only.

Many women find that, after divorce they have a hard time purchasing a home or car because they have spent years sharing credit with their spouse. All that credit you’ve had over the years with your spouse is helpful to him but once you are a single woman, you will get very little ‘credit’ for keeping those payments up.

Once you have a credit card in your name use is sparingly and make sure you are able to pay it off each month. The goal is to establish a good credit score not to run up a bunch of debt. This is done by using credit cards only to the degree that you are able to pay off monthly.

6. Evaluate Joint Financial Accounts:-

In step two above I discussed obtaining copies of financial documents. If you did that, you now have to figure out what to do with them. It isn’t uncommon, after learning there is an impending divorce for a spouse to raid financial accounts. Sometimes it is done out of anger, sometimes it is done on the advice of an adversarial divorce attorney.

You will want to protect yourself and keep your spouse from being able to clean out any joint accounts you have together. If you fear your spouse doing such a thing you can protect yourself by opening accounts in your name alone, remove 1/2 the funds from the joint accounts, and deposit them into your new accounts.

Do not hide the fact that you have done this and do not spend the money foolishly. Document every penny you spend so that you can have an accounting for it during settlement negotiations or in court. If you have savings accounts, money market accounts or any type investment accounts and you fear your spouse will tamper with those you should consider having the accounts frozen. You should, of course, discuss with your attorney any action you plan to take regarding joint financial accounts.

7. Close All Joint Credit Accounts:-

Before you separate when possible, pay off and close all joint credit accounts. Closing them before divorce proceedings will keep an angry spouse from using the account and running up charges that you may later be held responsible for.

If you can’t pay accounts in full you can negotiate with a creditor to pay less than is owed on an account.. If this is done, get a letter from the creditor that the account has been paid in full and a written promise that they will not file anything derogatory about the account to the credit reporting agencies.

If you are not able to pay off or come to a settlement agreement regarding the balance owed you should have the accounts frozen. This will keep you from being able to use the account but will also protect you in the end. Once the divorce is final, the balance owed on the account can be transferred to the party the court holds responsible for the debt. If the responsible party does not pay the debt then you don’t have to worry about it affecting your credit score.

Contact and alert creditors to the fact that you are going through a divorce. If there is a change of address, make sure they know it so that you will continue to receive bills from all joint accounts.

Make sure all credit card bills are being paid. Divorce proceedings can take months and all it takes is one late payment to hurt your credit. Even if you have to pay the minimum on accounts that you know will ultimately be your spouse’s responsibility it will be worth it.

8. Make The Decision to Either Stay or Move Out:-

The most common question I get from clients considering divorce is whether or not they can move out of the house. Unless there is abuse I normally tell them to stay where they are. There are many reasons for not leaving the marital home. The most important are:

  • It could affect the interest you have in the property. If you move out and your spouse pays the mortgage the entire time your divorce case is pending a judge may factor that into any decision he/she makes about property distribution. If the situation becomes too stressful and you feel you have to move try to continue to pay a portion of the mortgage payment. Document well any payments you make toward the mortgage.
  • If you have school-aged children and you hope to be able to remain in the marital home until they finish school the last thing you want to do is leave the home. If your spouses income in greater than your income and you want to negotiate him paying the mortgage or part of the mortgage you lose your ability to negotiate keeping the home once you leave the home. Stay put!

Moving out of the marital home can have a negative impact on your case. Do not do it without first discussing the issue with your attorney. In some states, a judge will consider a motion from your attorney for temporary possession of the marital home pending divorce court. You can discuss this option with your attorney.

If there is domestic abuse and you are unable to get an order of temporary possession then it is imperative to take whatever steps you need to protect yourself. Leave the home if you feel you are in danger. If there is a history of domestic violence discuss it with your attorney because he may be able to legally have your husband removed from the marital home.

9. Take The High Road:-

This means, no dating, no partying, no hanging out till all hours of the morning. If child custody is an issue in your case you need to make your children your number one priority…which they should already be. Don’t act like a good mother/father, be one. This is an especially stressful time for your children and they need you to stay focused on meeting your child’s needs.

If you become sexually frustrated, get over it. Sex is a luxury, not a necessity. Once you are divorced you can have all the sex you want. Until then don’t let your desire for sex put you in a situation a judge might view as questionable.

Spend time with friends, family and your children. Stay close to home, take care of yourself physically and emotionally, attend to your spiritual life and most of all, whatever you do, be above reproach. Behave yourself!

By |April 13th, 2018|consultation on divorce|0 Comments

consultation on divorce

Divorce under Hindu Marriage Act

Under the old Hindu laws, divorce was viewed as forbidden and was not talked about as freely as it is spoken out today, but with the codification of the laws the provision of divorce were laid down The provision of “Divorce” has been dealt with under the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955 as being a true blue method whereby both the parties to the marriage, decide to break all the promises or vows taken at the time of marriage. All Hindus, Buddhist, Jains or Sikhs are covered under the divorce provisions of the act.

Grounds for Divorce
The following grounds can be invoked for securing a divorce under the act:

Adultery: During the period of marriage, if either spouse maintains sexual relations with a person other than his or her lawfully wedded companion.
1. Cruelty: After the marriage, subjecting the petitioner to cruelty.
2. Desertion: If either one of the parties to the marriage deserts the other for a consistent span of at least two years , prior to the filing of the petition by the other party.
3. Conversion to another religion by either party other than Hinduism
4. Mental Disorder: If the spouse of the petitioner suffers from any unsoundness of mind, mental illness or disorder that cannot be cured, then the petitioner can file for divorce
5. Virulent and Incurable Disease: in the form of leprosy.
6. Venerable Disease in Communicable form.
7. The renunciation of the world or entered any religious order.
8. Not heard being alive for a period of seven years or more.
Additional Grounds for Dissolution of the Marriage by the Wife
Under the act, the wife is entitled to seek divorce from her husband on the following grounds:
1. Where the husband has another living wife from his previous subsisting marriage, before the commencement of the act.
2. Post the marriage, the husband was found guilty of rape, sodomy or bestiality.
3. Where the wife was awarded an order or decree for maintenance under section 18 of the Hindu Adoption and Maintenance Act, 1956 or under section 125 of the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1975, by the court, in spite of the fact that she was living apart from her husband even before the passage of such decree or order. The conjugal relations between the parties failed to resume within one year or more, even after the passage of this order.
4. The marriage was performed before the attainment of 15 years of age by the wife, and on completion of 15 years and not before 18 years of age, the wife rejected the marriage Under the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955, a divorce petition can be filed by the parties only after the passage of one year from the marriage date.

The Irretrievable breakdown of Marriage
The Marriage Laws (Amendment) Bill, 2010 incorporated another ground for seeking divorce, namely the ‘Irretrievable breakdown of marriage’ under the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955 and the Special Marriage Act, 1954. As the term suggests, it leads to a situation whereby, either or both the parties to the marriage fine it impossible to peacefully cohabit with each other, due to personality’s clashes, differences in opinion and have lived separately from each other for a long period of time and are no longer too eager to further carry on their matrimonial relationship.

Section 13B in the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955
*13B DIVORCE BY MUTUAL CONSENT —

(1) Subject to the provisions of this Act a petition for dissolution of marriage by a decree of divorce may be presented to the district court by both the parties to a marriage together, whether such marriage was solemnized before or after the commencement of the Marriage Laws (Amendment) Act, 1976 (68 of 1976)*, on the ground that they have been living separately for a period of one year or more, that they have not been able to live together and that they have mutually agreed that the marriage should be dissolved.

(2) On the motion of both the parties made not earlier than six months after the date of the presentation of the petition referred to in sub-section (1) and not later than eighteen months after the said date, if the petition is not withdrawn in the meantime, the court shall, on being satisfied, after hearing the parties and after making such inquiry as it thinks fit, that a marriage has been solemnized and that the averments in the petition are true, pass a decree of divorce declaring the marriage to be dissolved with effect from the date of the decree.]

(i) The period of 6 to 18 months provided in section 13B is a period of interregnum which is intended to give time and opportunity to the parties to reflect on their move. In this transitional period the parties or either of them may have second thoughts; Suman v. Surendra Kumar, AIR 2003 Raj 155.

(ii) The period of living separately for one year must be immediately preceding the presentation of petition. The expression ‘living separately’ connotes not living like husband and wife. It has no reference to the place of living. The parties may live under the same roof and yet they may not be living as husband and wife. The parties should have no desire to perform marital obligations; Sureshta Devi v. Om Prakash, AIR 1992 SC 1904.

(iii) The period of six to eighteen months time is given in divorce by mutual consent as to give time and opportunity to the parties to reflect on their move and seek advice from relations and friends. Mutual consent should continue till the divorce decree is passed. The court should be satisfied about the bona fides and consent of the parties. If there is no consent at the time of enquiry the court gets no jurisdiction to make a decree for divorce. If the court is held to have the power to make a decree solely based on the initial petition, it negates the whole idea of mutuality. There can be unilateral withdrawal of consent. Held, that since consent of the wife was obtained by fraud and wife was not willing to consent, there could be unilateral withdrawal, of consent; Sureshta Devi v. Om Prakash, AIR 1992 SC 1904.

*PROCEDURE FOR MUTUAL CONSENT DIVORCE
Mutual Consent Divorce was brought by the India Parliament vide Amendment in the year 1976 in the Hindu Marriage Act.
As per law, duration/time of obtaining mutual consent divorce is six months. Although, parties have option of filing the second motion petition any time between six months and eighteen months from the date of the filing of the Mutual Consent Divorce Petition.
As a mutual consent divorce lawyers, we “VED LEGAL” provide platform to parties to discuss these issues in calm atmosphere and reach to their own solutions. We provide different options using our vast experience in the field to resolve issues affecting the chances of settlement.

Petition for mutual consent divorce can be filed at any of the following place:-
• Place where marriage had taken place
• Place where husband and wife last resided together.
• Place where wife is residing at the time of filing of the Petition

Once petition for divorce by mutual consent is filed, parties presence are required in the Court for recording of the statement. In the event one of the party is unable to come, such party can appear through power of attorney. Such power of attorney preferably should be a family member of the spouse. Once statement is recorded, it is commonly called First Motion has been granted.
After passing of first motion, parties are called upon to wait for six months period before moving Petition for second motion. This period is extendible unto eighteen months. This six months period in mutual consent divorce is generally called cooling-off period. Six months period are given to parties to think over their relationship again. It is given for reconciliation.
After six months period, if parties have been unable to resolve their differences, they will have to appear in the Court again. Statement of parties would be recorded again.

During the period of six months i.e. before moving second motion, both parties have liberty to withdraw their consent for divorce.
After this Court passes an order dissolving the marriage by granting decree of divorce and thereby marriage stands dissolved.

*DIVORCE LAWS

vary from religion to religion in a country with a rich cultural diversity like India. Hindus(which includes Sikh, Jain, Budh) are governed by Hindu Marriage Act,1955. Christians are governed by Indian Divorce Act-1869 & The Indian Christian Marriage Act,1872. Muslims are governed by Personnel laws of Divorce and also the Dissolution of Marriage Act,1939 & The Muslim Women(Protection of Rights on Divorce) Act,1986. Similarly, Parsis are governed by The Parsi Marriage & Divorce Act-1936. And there is also a secular law called Special Marriage Act,1954. A cursory reading of the entire gamut of Indian Laws regarding Divorce makes it clear broadly that the Divorce can be obtained by two ways:

1. Divorce by Mutual Consent

Mutual Consent Divorce is a simple way of coming out of the marriage and dissolves it legally. An important requirement is the mutual consent of the husband & wife. There are two aspects on which Husband & Wife are required to reach a consensus. One is the alimony or maintenance issues. As per Law, there is no minimum or maximum limit of maintenance. It could be any figure or no figure. Next important consideration is the Child Custody. This can also be worked out effectively between the parties. Child Custody in Mutual Consent Divorce can be shared or joint or exclusive depending upon the understanding of the spouses. Duration of Divorce in Mutual Consent varies from one month to six months or more from States to States and as per the High Court directions.

2. Contested Divorce

As the name suggests, you will have to contest it. Indian laws, in general, recognizes cruelty (Physical & Mental), Desertion (Period varies from 2 to 3 years), Unsoundness of mind( of Incurable form), Impotency, renouncing the world, etc. The aggrieved party has to take one of the above grounds for divorce and will have to file the case in the Court of appropriate jurisdiction. Party which files the case has to prove the case with the support of evidence and documents. On successfully proving the case, divorce will be granted and divorce decree will be drawn up accordingly.

ANNULMENT OF MARRIAGE:

Marriage in India can also be dissolved by means of Annulment. Procedure for annulment is same as that of Divorce except that the grounds for annulment are different than that of divorce. Grounds for annulment are fraud, pregnancy of wife by a person other than the husband, impotency prior to the marriage and subsist even at the time of filing the case. Once an annulment is granted by the Indian Court, the status of the parties remains as it was prior to the marriage.

VOID MARRIAGE:

There are certain forms of marriages which are null and void despite the performance /solemnization of the same. Marriage is void under following circumstances:-

a) neither party has a spouse living at the time of the marriage

b) the parties are not within the degrees of prohibited relationship, unless the custom or usage governing each of them permits of a marriage between the two;

c) the parties are not sapindas of each other unless the custom or usage governing each of them permits of a marriage between the two.

The time duration for obtaining divorce varies from case to case & place to place. Generally speaking, contested divorce proceedings take approximately 18 to 24 months. Mutual Consent Divorce varies from 4 weeks to 7 months and more. In Delhi, Mutual Consent Divorce is possible within two to four weeks. Generally speaking procedure for obtaining Divorce in all forms of law (based on religion) is same with only a mild variation.
For More information please contact us:

Consultants for Housing Co-operative Society in Pune
Ved Legal
Email: [email protected] / [email protected]
Mobile: +91 9763040088

*DIVORCE BY MUTUAL CONSENT

Mutual Consent Divorce was brought by the India Parliament vide Amendment in the year 1976 in the Hindu Marriage Act.
Divorce by Mutual Consent means when both Husband and wife has agreed amicably amongst themselves that they cannot live together anymore and that the best solution is to Divorce, without putting forth any allegations against each other, in the court of law, than such a Divorce petition presented jointly before the honorably court, is known as mutual consent Divorce.
It is the quickest form of divorce in India. The Conditions required under Section 13B of the Hindu Marriage Act are as follows:
(i) Husband and wife have been living separately for a period of one year or more,
(ii) That they are unable to live together,
(iii) And that both husband and wife have mutually agreed that the marriage has totally collapsed, hence marriage should be dissolved.

As per law, duration/time of obtaining mutual consent divorce is six months. Although, parties have option of filing the second motion petition any time between six months and eighteen months from the date of the filing of the Mutual Consent Divorce Petition.

PETITION FOR MUTUAL CONSENT DIVORCE CAN BE FILED AT ANY OF THE FOLLOWING PLACE:-
• Place where marriage had taken place
• Place where husband and wife last resided together.
• Place where wife is residing at the time of filing of the Petition

Once petition for divorce by mutual consent is filed, party’s presences are required in the Court for recording of the statement. In the event one of the party is unable to come, such party can appear through power of attorney. Such power of attorney preferably should be a family member of the spouse. Once statement is recorded, it is commonly called First Motion has been granted.

After passing of first motion, parties are called upon to wait for six months period before moving Petition for second motion. This period is extendible unto eighteen months. This six months period in mutual consent divorce is generally called cooling-off period. Six months period are given to parties to think their relationship again. It is given for reconciliation.
After six months period, if parties have been unable to resolve their differences, they will have to appear in the Court again. Statement of parties would be recorded again.

During the period of six months i.e. before moving second motion, both parties have liberty to withdraw their consent for divorce.
After this Court passes an order dissolving the marriage by granting decree of divorce and thereby marriage stands dissolved.

ADVANTAGES OF MUTUAL DIVORCE
Divorce by Mutual consent saves time, money and energy for both, Leaves no room for unnecessary quarrel.

By |November 4th, 2017|consultation on divorce|0 Comments

consultation on divorce

Divorce under Hindu Marriage Act

Under the old Hindu laws, divorce was viewed as forbidden and was not talked about as freely as it is spoken out today, but with the codification of the laws the provision of divorce were laid down The provision of “Divorce” has been dealt with under the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955 as being a true blue method whereby both the parties to the marriage, decide to break all the promises or vows taken at the time of marriage. All Hindus, Buddhist, Jains or Sikhs are covered under the divorce provisions of the act.

Grounds for Divorce
The following grounds can be invoked for securing a divorce under the act:

Adultery: During the period of marriage, if either spouse maintains sexual relations with a person other than his or her lawfully wedded companion.
1. Cruelty: After the marriage, subjecting the petitioner to cruelty.
2. Desertion: If either one of the parties to the marriage deserts the other for a consistent span of at least two years , prior to the filing of the petition by the other party.
3. Conversion to another religion by either party other than Hinduism
4. Mental Disorder: If the spouse of the petitioner suffers from any unsoundness of mind, mental illness or disorder that cannot be cured, then the petitioner can file for divorce
5. Virulent and Incurable Disease: in the form of leprosy.
6. Venerable Disease in Communicable form.
7. The renunciation of the world or entered any religious order.
8. Not heard being alive for a period of seven years or more.
Additional Grounds for Dissolution of the Marriage by the Wife
Under the act, the wife is entitled to seek divorce from her husband on the following grounds:
1. Where the husband has another living wife from his previous subsisting marriage, before the commencement of the act.
2. Post the marriage, the husband was found guilty of rape, sodomy or bestiality.
3. Where the wife was awarded an order or decree for maintenance under section 18 of the Hindu Adoption and Maintenance Act, 1956 or under section 125 of the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1975, by the court, in spite of the fact that she was living apart from her husband even before the passage of such decree or order. The conjugal relations between the parties failed to resume within one year or more, even after the passage of this order.
4. The marriage was performed before the attainment of 15 years of age by the wife, and on completion of 15 years and not before 18 years of age, the wife rejected the marriage Under the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955, a divorce petition can be filed by the parties only after the passage of one year from the marriage date.

The Irretrievable breakdown of Marriage
The Marriage Laws (Amendment) Bill, 2010 incorporated another ground for seeking divorce, namely the ‘Irretrievable breakdown of marriage’ under the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955 and the Special Marriage Act, 1954. As the term suggests, it leads to a situation whereby, either or both the parties to the marriage fine it impossible to peacefully cohabit with each other, due to personality’s clashes, differences in opinion and have lived separately from each other for a long period of time and are no longer too eager to further carry on their matrimonial relationship.

Section 13B in the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955
*13B DIVORCE BY MUTUAL CONSENT —

(1) Subject to the provisions of this Act a petition for dissolution of marriage by a decree of divorce may be presented to the district court by both the parties to a marriage together, whether such marriage was solemnized before or after the commencement of the Marriage Laws (Amendment) Act, 1976 (68 of 1976)*, on the ground that they have been living separately for a period of one year or more, that they have not been able to live together and that they have mutually agreed that the marriage should be dissolved.

(2) On the motion of both the parties made not earlier than six months after the date of the presentation of the petition referred to in sub-section (1) and not later than eighteen months after the said date, if the petition is not withdrawn in the meantime, the court shall, on being satisfied, after hearing the parties and after making such inquiry as it thinks fit, that a marriage has been solemnized and that the averments in the petition are true, pass a decree of divorce declaring the marriage to be dissolved with effect from the date of the decree.]

(i) The period of 6 to 18 months provided in section 13B is a period of interregnum which is intended to give time and opportunity to the parties to reflect on their move. In this transitional period the parties or either of them may have second thoughts; Suman v. Surendra Kumar, AIR 2003 Raj 155.

(ii) The period of living separately for one year must be immediately preceding the presentation of petition. The expression ‘living separately’ connotes not living like husband and wife. It has no reference to the place of living. The parties may live under the same roof and yet they may not be living as husband and wife. The parties should have no desire to perform marital obligations; Sureshta Devi v. Om Prakash, AIR 1992 SC 1904.

(iii) The period of six to eighteen months time is given in divorce by mutual consent as to give time and opportunity to the parties to reflect on their move and seek advice from relations and friends. Mutual consent should continue till the divorce decree is passed. The court should be satisfied about the bona fides and consent of the parties. If there is no consent at the time of enquiry the court gets no jurisdiction to make a decree for divorce. If the court is held to have the power to make a decree solely based on the initial petition, it negates the whole idea of mutuality. There can be unilateral withdrawal of consent. Held, that since consent of the wife was obtained by fraud and wife was not willing to consent, there could be unilateral withdrawal, of consent; Sureshta Devi v. Om Prakash, AIR 1992 SC 1904.

*PROCEDURE FOR MUTUAL CONSENT DIVORCE
Mutual Consent Divorce was brought by the India Parliament vide Amendment in the year 1976 in the Hindu Marriage Act.
As per law, duration/time of obtaining mutual consent divorce is six months. Although, parties have option of filing the second motion petition any time between six months and eighteen months from the date of the filing of the Mutual Consent Divorce Petition.
As a mutual consent divorce lawyers, we “VED LEGAL” provide platform to parties to discuss these issues in calm atmosphere and reach to their own solutions. We provide different options using our vast experience in the field to resolve issues affecting the chances of settlement.
Petition for mutual consent divorce can be filed at any of the following place:-
• Place where marriage had taken place
• Place where husband and wife last resided together.
• Place where wife is residing at the time of filing of the Petition

Once petition for divorce by mutual consent is filed, parties presence are required in the Court for recording of the statement. In the event one of the party is unable to come, such party can appear through power of attorney. Such power of attorney preferably should be a family member of the spouse. Once statement is recorded, it is commonly called First Motion has been granted.
After passing of first motion, parties are called upon to wait for six months period before moving Petition for second motion. This period is extendible unto eighteen months. This six months period in mutual consent divorce is generally called cooling-off period. Six months period are given to parties to think over their relationship again. It is given for reconciliation.
After six months period, if parties have been unable to resolve their differences, they will have to appear in the Court again. Statement of parties would be recorded again.
During the period of six months i.e. before moving second motion, both parties have liberty to withdraw their consent for divorce.
After this Court passes an order dissolving the marriage by granting decree of divorce and thereby marriage stands dissolved.

*DIVORCE LAWS

vary from religion to religion in a country with a rich cultural diversity like India. Hindus(which includes Sikh, Jain, Budh) are governed by Hindu Marriage Act,1955. Christians are governed by Indian Divorce Act-1869 & The Indian Christian Marriage Act,1872. Muslims are governed by Personnel laws of Divorce and also the Dissolution of Marriage Act,1939 & The Muslim Women(Protection of Rights on Divorce) Act,1986. Similarly, Parsis are governed by The Parsi Marriage & Divorce Act-1936. And there is also a secular law called Special Marriage Act,1954. A cursory reading of the entire gamut of Indian Laws regarding Divorce makes it clear broadly that the Divorce can be obtained by two ways:

1. Divorce by Mutual Consent

Mutual Consent Divorce is a simple way of coming out of the marriage and dissolves it legally. An important requirement is the mutual consent of the husband & wife. There are two aspects on which Husband & Wife are required to reach a consensus. One is the alimony or maintenance issues. As per Law, there is no minimum or maximum limit of maintenance. It could be any figure or no figure. Next important consideration is the Child Custody. This can also be worked out effectively between the parties. Child Custody in Mutual Consent Divorce can be shared or joint or exclusive depending upon the understanding of the spouses. Duration of Divorce in Mutual Consent varies from one month to six months or more from States to States and as per the High Court directions.

2. Contested Divorce

As the name suggests, you will have to contest it. Indian laws, in general, recognizes cruelty (Physical & Mental), Desertion (Period varies from 2 to 3 years), Unsoundness of mind( of Incurable form), Impotency, renouncing the world, etc. The aggrieved party has to take one of the above grounds for divorce and will have to file the case in the Court of appropriate jurisdiction. Party which files the case has to prove the case with the support of evidence and documents. On successfully proving the case, divorce will be granted and divorce decree will be drawn up accordingly.

ANNULMENT OF MARRIAGE:

Marriage in India can also be dissolved by means of Annulment. Procedure for annulment is same as that of Divorce except that the grounds for annulment are different than that of divorce. Grounds for annulment are fraud, pregnancy of wife by a person other than the husband, impotency prior to the marriage and subsist even at the time of filing the case. Once an annulment is granted by the Indian Court, the status of the parties remains as it was prior to the marriage.

VOID MARRIAGE:

There are certain forms of marriages which are null and void despite the performance /solemnization of the same. Marriage is void under following circumstances:-

a) neither party has a spouse living at the time of the marriage

b) the parties are not within the degrees of prohibited relationship, unless the custom or usage governing each of them permits of a marriage between the two;

c) the parties are not sapindas of each other unless the custom or usage governing each of them permits of a marriage between the two.

The time duration for obtaining divorce varies from case to case & place to place. Generally speaking, contested divorce proceedings take approximately 18 to 24 months. Mutual Consent Divorce varies from 4 weeks to 7 months and more. In Delhi, Mutual Consent Divorce is possible within two to four weeks. Generally speaking procedure for obtaining Divorce in all forms of law (based on religion) is same with only a mild variation.
For More information please contact us:

Consultants for Housing Co-operative Society in Pune
Ved Legal
Email: [email protected] / [email protected]
Mobile: +91 9763040088

*DIVORCE BY MUTUAL CONSENT

Mutual Consent Divorce was brought by the India Parliament vide Amendment in the year 1976 in the Hindu Marriage Act.
Divorce by Mutual Consent means when both Husband and wife has agreed amicably amongst themselves that they cannot live together anymore and that the best solution is to Divorce, without putting forth any allegations against each other, in the court of law, than such a Divorce petition presented jointly before the honorably court, is known as mutual consent Divorce.
It is the quickest form of divorce in India. The Conditions required under Section 13B of the Hindu Marriage Act are as follows:
(i) Husband and wife have been living separately for a period of one year or more,
(ii) That they are unable to live together,
(iii) And that both husband and wife have mutually agreed that the marriage has totally collapsed, hence marriage should be dissolved.

As per law, duration/time of obtaining mutual consent divorce is six months. Although, parties have option of filing the second motion petition any time between six months and eighteen months from the date of the filing of the Mutual Consent Divorce Petition.

PETITION FOR MUTUAL CONSENT DIVORCE CAN BE FILED AT ANY OF THE FOLLOWING PLACE:-
• Place where marriage had taken place
• Place where husband and wife last resided together.
• Place where wife is residing at the time of filing of the Petition

Once petition for divorce by mutual consent is filed, party’s presences are required in the Court for recording of the statement. In the event one of the party is unable to come, such party can appear through power of attorney. Such power of attorney preferably should be a family member of the spouse. Once statement is recorded, it is commonly called First Motion has been granted.
After passing of first motion, parties are called upon to wait for six months period before moving Petition for second motion. This period is extendible unto eighteen months. This six months period in mutual consent divorce is generally called cooling-off period. Six months period are given to parties to think their relationship again. It is given for reconciliation.
After six months period, if parties have been unable to resolve their differences, they will have to appear in the Court again. Statement of parties would be recorded again.
During the period of six months i.e. before moving second motion, both parties have liberty to withdraw their consent for divorce.
After this Court passes an order dissolving the marriage by granting decree of divorce and thereby marriage stands dissolved.

ADVANTAGES OF MUTUAL DIVORCE
Divorce by Mutual consent saves time, money and energy for both, Leaves no room for unnecessary quarrel.

By |November 1st, 2017|consultation on divorce|0 Comments

consultation on divorce

Divorce under Hindu Marriage Act

Under the old Hindu laws, divorce was viewed as forbidden and was not talked about as freely as it is spoken out today, but with the codification of the laws the provision of divorce were laid down The provision of “Divorce” has been dealt with under the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955 as being a true blue method whereby both the parties to the marriage, decide to break all the promises or vows taken at the time of marriage. All Hindus, Buddhist, Jains or Sikhs are covered under the divorce provisions of the act.

Grounds for Divorce
The following grounds can be invoked for securing a divorce under the act:

Adultery: During the period of marriage, if either spouse maintains sexual relations with a person other than his or her lawfully wedded companion.
1. Cruelty: After the marriage, subjecting the petitioner to cruelty.
2. Desertion: If either one of the parties to the marriage deserts the other for a consistent span of at least two years , prior to the filing of the petition by the other party.
3. Conversion to another religion by either party other than Hinduism
4. Mental Disorder: If the spouse of the petitioner suffers from any unsoundness of mind, mental illness or disorder that cannot be cured, then the petitioner can file for divorce
5. Virulent and Incurable Disease: in the form of leprosy.
6. Venerable Disease in Communicable form.
7. The renunciation of the world or entered any religious order.
8. Not heard being alive for a period of seven years or more.

Additional Grounds for Dissolution of the Marriage by the Wife
Under the act, the wife is entitled to seek divorce from her husband on the following grounds:
1. Where the husband has another living wife from his previous subsisting marriage, before the commencement of the act.
2. Post the marriage, the husband was found guilty of rape, sodomy or bestiality.
3. Where the wife was awarded an order or decree for maintenance under section 18 of the Hindu Adoption and Maintenance Act, 1956 or under section 125 of the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1975, by the court, in spite of the fact that she was living apart from her husband even before the passage of such decree or order. The conjugal relations between the parties failed to resume within one year or more, even after the passage of this order.
4. The marriage was performed before the attainment of 15 years of age by the wife, and on completion of 15 years and not before 18 years of age, the wife rejected the marriage Under the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955, a divorce petition can be filed by the parties only after the passage of one year from the marriage date.

The Irretrievable breakdown of Marriage
The Marriage Laws (Amendment) Bill, 2010 incorporated another ground for seeking divorce, namely the ‘Irretrievable breakdown of marriage’ under the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955 and the Special Marriage Act, 1954. As the term suggests, it leads to a situation whereby, either or both the parties to the marriage fine it impossible to peacefully cohabit with each other, due to personality’s clashes, differences in opinion and have lived separately from each other for a long period of time and are no longer too eager to further carry on their matrimonial relationship.

Section 13B in the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955
*13B DIVORCE BY MUTUAL CONSENT —

(1) Subject to the provisions of this Act a petition for dissolution of marriage by a decree of divorce may be presented to the district court by both the parties to a marriage together, whether such marriage was solemnized before or after the commencement of the Marriage Laws (Amendment) Act, 1976 (68 of 1976)*, on the ground that they have been living separately for a period of one year or more, that they have not been able to live together and that they have mutually agreed that the marriage should be dissolved.

(2) On the motion of both the parties made not earlier than six months after the date of the presentation of the petition referred to in sub-section (1) and not later than eighteen months after the said date, if the petition is not withdrawn in the meantime, the court shall, on being satisfied, after hearing the parties and after making such inquiry as it thinks fit, that a marriage has been solemnized and that the averments in the petition are true, pass a decree of divorce declaring the marriage to be dissolved with effect from the date of the decree.]

(i) The period of 6 to 18 months provided in section 13B is a period of interregnum which is intended to give time and opportunity to the parties to reflect on their move. In this transitional period the parties or either of them may have second thoughts; Suman v. Surendra Kumar, AIR 2003 Raj 155.

(ii) The period of living separately for one year must be immediately preceding the presentation of petition. The expression ‘living separately’ connotes not living like husband and wife. It has no reference to the place of living. The parties may live under the same roof and yet they may not be living as husband and wife. The parties should have no desire to perform marital obligations; Sureshta Devi v. Om Prakash, AIR 1992 SC 1904.

(iii) The period of six to eighteen months time is given in divorce by mutual consent as to give time and opportunity to the parties to reflect on their move and seek advice from relations and friends. Mutual consent should continue till the divorce decree is passed. The court should be satisfied about the bona fides and consent of the parties. If there is no consent at the time of enquiry the court gets no jurisdiction to make a decree for divorce. If the court is held to have the power to make a decree solely based on the initial petition, it negates the whole idea of mutuality. There can be unilateral withdrawal of consent. Held, that since consent of the wife was obtained by fraud and wife was not willing to consent, there could be unilateral withdrawal, of consent; Sureshta Devi v. Om Prakash, AIR 1992 SC 1904.

*PROCEDURE FOR MUTUAL CONSENT DIVORCE
Mutual Consent Divorce was brought by the India Parliament vide Amendment in the year 1976 in the Hindu Marriage Act.
As per law, duration/time of obtaining mutual consent divorce is six months. Although, parties have option of filing the second motion petition any time between six months and eighteen months from the date of the filing of the Mutual Consent Divorce Petition.
As a mutual consent divorce lawyers, we “VED LEGAL” provide platform to parties to discuss these issues in calm atmosphere and reach to their own solutions. We provide different options using our vast experience in the field to resolve issues affecting the chances of settlement.
Petition for mutual consent divorce can be filed at any of the following place:-

• Place where marriage had taken place
• Place where husband and wife last resided together.
• Place where wife is residing at the time of filing of the Petition

Once petition for divorce by mutual consent is filed, parties presence are required in the Court for recording of the statement. In the event one of the party is unable to come, such party can appear through power of attorney. Such power of attorney preferably should be a family member of the spouse. Once statement is recorded, it is commonly called First Motion has been granted.
After passing of first motion, parties are called upon to wait for six months period before moving Petition for second motion. This period is extendible unto eighteen months. This six months period in mutual consent divorce is generally called cooling-off period. Six months period are given to parties to think over their relationship again. It is given for reconciliation.
After six months period, if parties have been unable to resolve their differences, they will have to appear in the Court again. Statement of parties would be recorded again.

During the period of six months i.e. before moving second motion, both parties have liberty to withdraw their consent for divorce.
After this Court passes an order dissolving the marriage by granting decree of divorce and thereby marriage stands dissolved.

*DIVORCE LAWS

vary from religion to religion in a country with a rich cultural diversity like India. Hindus(which includes Sikh, Jain, Budh) are governed by Hindu Marriage Act,1955. Christians are governed by Indian Divorce Act-1869 & The Indian Christian Marriage Act,1872. Muslims are governed by Personnel laws of Divorce and also the Dissolution of Marriage Act,1939 & The Muslim Women(Protection of Rights on Divorce) Act,1986. Similarly, Parsis are governed by The Parsi Marriage & Divorce Act-1936. And there is also a secular law called Special Marriage Act,1954. A cursory reading of the entire gamut of Indian Laws regarding Divorce makes it clear broadly that the Divorce can be obtained by two ways:

1. Divorce by Mutual Consent

Mutual Consent Divorce is a simple way of coming out of the marriage and dissolves it legally. An important requirement is the mutual consent of the husband & wife. There are two aspects on which Husband & Wife are required to reach a consensus. One is the alimony or maintenance issues. As per Law, there is no minimum or maximum limit of maintenance. It could be any figure or no figure. Next important consideration is the Child Custody. This can also be worked out effectively between the parties. Child Custody in Mutual Consent Divorce can be shared or joint or exclusive depending upon the understanding of the spouses. Duration of Divorce in Mutual Consent varies from one month to six months or more from States to States and as per the High Court directions.

2. Contested Divorce

As the name suggests, you will have to contest it. Indian laws, in general, recognizes cruelty (Physical & Mental), Desertion (Period varies from 2 to 3 years), Unsoundness of mind( of Incurable form), Impotency, renouncing the world, etc. The aggrieved party has to take one of the above grounds for divorce and will have to file the case in the Court of appropriate jurisdiction. Party which files the case has to prove the case with the support of evidence and documents. On successfully proving the case, divorce will be granted and divorce decree will be drawn up accordingly.

ANNULMENT OF MARRIAGE:

Marriage in India can also be dissolved by means of Annulment. Procedure for annulment is same as that of Divorce except that the grounds for annulment are different than that of divorce. Grounds for annulment are fraud, pregnancy of wife by a person other than the husband, impotency prior to the marriage and subsist even at the time of filing the case. Once an annulment is granted by the Indian Court, the status of the parties remains as it was prior to the marriage.

VOID MARRIAGE:

There are certain forms of marriages which are null and void despite the performance /solemnization of the same. Marriage is void under following circumstances:-

a) neither party has a spouse living at the time of the marriage

b) the parties are not within the degrees of prohibited relationship, unless the custom or usage governing each of them permits of a marriage between the two;

c) the parties are not sapindas of each other unless the custom or usage governing each of them permits of a marriage between the two.

The time duration for obtaining divorce varies from case to case & place to place. Generally speaking, contested divorce proceedings take approximately 18 to 24 months. Mutual Consent Divorce varies from 4 weeks to 7 months and more. In Delhi, Mutual Consent Divorce is possible within two to four weeks. Generally speaking procedure for obtaining Divorce in all forms of law (based on religion) is same with only a mild variation.
For More information please contact us:

Consultants for Housing Co-operative Society in Pune
Ved Legal
Email: [email protected] / [email protected]
Mobile: +91 9763040088

*DIVORCE BY MUTUAL CONSENT

Mutual Consent Divorce was brought by the India Parliament vide Amendment in the year 1976 in the Hindu Marriage Act.
Divorce by Mutual Consent means when both Husband and wife has agreed amicably amongst themselves that they cannot live together anymore and that the best solution is to Divorce, without putting forth any allegations against each other, in the court of law, than such a Divorce petition presented jointly before the honorably court, is known as mutual consent Divorce.

It is the quickest form of divorce in India. The Conditions required under Section 13B of the Hindu Marriage Act are as follows:
(i) Husband and wife have been living separately for a period of one year or more,
(ii) That they are unable to live together,
(iii) And that both husband and wife have mutually agreed that the marriage has totally collapsed, hence marriage should be dissolved.

As per law, duration/time of obtaining mutual consent divorce is six months. Although, parties have option of filing the second motion petition any time between six months and eighteen months from the date of the filing of the Mutual Consent Divorce Petition.

PETITION FOR MUTUAL CONSENT DIVORCE CAN BE FILED AT ANY OF THE FOLLOWING PLACE:-
• Place where marriage had taken place
• Place where husband and wife last resided together.
• Place where wife is residing at the time of filing of the Petition

Once petition for divorce by mutual consent is filed, party’s presences are required in the Court for recording of the statement. In the event one of the party is unable to come, such party can appear through power of attorney. Such power of attorney preferably should be a family member of the spouse. Once statement is recorded, it is commonly called First Motion has been granted.
After passing of first motion, parties are called upon to wait for six months period before moving Petition for second motion. This period is extendible unto eighteen months. This six months period in mutual consent divorce is generally called cooling-off period. Six months period are given to parties to think their relationship again. It is given for reconciliation.
After six months period, if parties have been unable to resolve their differences, they will have to appear in the Court again. Statement of parties would be recorded again.

During the period of six months i.e. before moving second motion, both parties have liberty to withdraw their consent for divorce.
After this Court passes an order dissolving the marriage by granting decree of divorce and thereby marriage stands dissolved.

ADVANTAGES OF MUTUAL DIVORCE
Divorce by Mutual consent saves time, money and energy for both, Leaves no room for unnecessary quarrel.

By |October 28th, 2017|consultation on divorce|0 Comments

consultation on divorce

Divorce under Hindu Marriage Act

Under the old Hindu laws, divorce was viewed as forbidden and was not talked about as freely as it is spoken out today, but with the codification of the laws the provision of divorce were laid down The provision of “Divorce” has been dealt with under the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955 as being a true blue method whereby both the parties to the marriage, decide to break all the promises or vows taken at the time of marriage. All Hindus, Buddhist, Jains or Sikhs are covered under the divorce provisions of the act.

Grounds for Divorce
The following grounds can be invoked for securing a divorce under the act:

Adultery: During the period of marriage, if either spouse maintains sexual relations with a person other than his or her lawfully wedded companion.
1. Cruelty: After the marriage, subjecting the petitioner to cruelty.
2. Desertion: If either one of the parties to the marriage deserts the other for a consistent span of at least two years , prior to the filing of the petition by the other party.
3. Conversion to another religion by either party other than Hinduism
4. Mental Disorder: If the spouse of the petitioner suffers from any unsoundness of mind, mental illness or disorder that cannot be cured, then the petitioner can file for divorce
5. Virulent and Incurable Disease: in the form of leprosy.
6. Venerable Disease in Communicable form.
7. The renunciation of the world or entered any religious order.
8. Not heard being alive for a period of seven years or more.
Additional Grounds for Dissolution of the Marriage by the Wife
Under the act, the wife is entitled to seek divorce from her husband on the following grounds:
1. Where the husband has another living wife from his previous subsisting marriage, before the commencement of the act.
2. Post the marriage, the husband was found guilty of rape, sodomy or bestiality.
3. Where the wife was awarded an order or decree for maintenance under section 18 of the Hindu Adoption and Maintenance Act, 1956 or under section 125 of the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1975, by the court, in spite of the fact that she was living apart from her husband even before the passage of such decree or order. The conjugal relations between the parties failed to resume within one year or more, even after the passage of this order.
4. The marriage was performed before the attainment of 15 years of age by the wife, and on completion of 15 years and not before 18 years of age, the wife rejected the marriage Under the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955, a divorce petition can be filed by the parties only after the passage of one year from the marriage date.

The Irretrievable breakdown of Marriage
The Marriage Laws (Amendment) Bill, 2010 incorporated another ground for seeking divorce, namely the ‘Irretrievable breakdown of marriage’ under the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955 and the Special Marriage Act, 1954. As the term suggests, it leads to a situation whereby, either or both the parties to the marriage fine it impossible to peacefully cohabit with each other, due to personality’s clashes, differences in opinion and have lived separately from each other for a long period of time and are no longer too eager to further carry on their matrimonial relationship.

Section 13B in the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955
*13B DIVORCE BY MUTUAL CONSENT —

(1) Subject to the provisions of this Act a petition for dissolution of marriage by a decree of divorce may be presented to the district court by both the parties to a marriage together, whether such marriage was solemnized before or after the commencement of the Marriage Laws (Amendment) Act, 1976 (68 of 1976)*, on the ground that they have been living separately for a period of one year or more, that they have not been able to live together and that they have mutually agreed that the marriage should be dissolved.

(2) On the motion of both the parties made not earlier than six months after the date of the presentation of the petition referred to in sub-section (1) and not later than eighteen months after the said date, if the petition is not withdrawn in the meantime, the court shall, on being satisfied, after hearing the parties and after making such inquiry as it thinks fit, that a marriage has been solemnized and that the averments in the petition are true, pass a decree of divorce declaring the marriage to be dissolved with effect from the date of the decree.]

(i) The period of 6 to 18 months provided in section 13B is a period of interregnum which is intended to give time and opportunity to the parties to reflect on their move. In this transitional period the parties or either of them may have second thoughts; Suman v. Surendra Kumar, AIR 2003 Raj 155.

(ii) The period of living separately for one year must be immediately preceding the presentation of petition. The expression ‘living separately’ connotes not living like husband and wife. It has no reference to the place of living. The parties may live under the same roof and yet they may not be living as husband and wife. The parties should have no desire to perform marital obligations; Sureshta Devi v. Om Prakash, AIR 1992 SC 1904.

(iii) The period of six to eighteen months time is given in divorce by mutual consent as to give time and opportunity to the parties to reflect on their move and seek advice from relations and friends. Mutual consent should continue till the divorce decree is passed. The court should be satisfied about the bona fides and consent of the parties. If there is no consent at the time of enquiry the court gets no jurisdiction to make a decree for divorce. If the court is held to have the power to make a decree solely based on the initial petition, it negates the whole idea of mutuality. There can be unilateral withdrawal of consent. Held, that since consent of the wife was obtained by fraud and wife was not willing to consent, there could be unilateral withdrawal, of consent; Sureshta Devi v. Om Prakash, AIR 1992 SC 1904.

*PROCEDURE FOR MUTUAL CONSENT DIVORCE
Mutual Consent Divorce was brought by the India Parliament vide Amendment in the year 1976 in the Hindu Marriage Act.
As per law, duration/time of obtaining mutual consent divorce is six months. Although, parties have option of filing the second motion petition any time between six months and eighteen months from the date of the filing of the Mutual Consent Divorce Petition.
As a mutual consent divorce lawyers, we “VED LEGAL” provide platform to parties to discuss these issues in calm atmosphere and reach to their own solutions. We provide different options using our vast experience in the field to resolve issues affecting the chances of settlement.
Petition for mutual consent divorce can be filed at any of the following place:-

• Place where marriage had taken place
• Place where husband and wife last resided together.
• Place where wife is residing at the time of filing of the Petition

Once petition for divorce by mutual consent is filed, parties presence are required in the Court for recording of the statement. In the event one of the party is unable to come, such party can appear through power of attorney. Such power of attorney preferably should be a family member of the spouse. Once statement is recorded, it is commonly called First Motion has been granted.
After passing of first motion, parties are called upon to wait for six months period before moving Petition for second motion. This period is extendible unto eighteen months. This six months period in mutual consent divorce is generally called cooling-off period. Six months period are given to parties to think over their relationship again. It is given for reconciliation.
After six months period, if parties have been unable to resolve their differences, they will have to appear in the Court again. Statement of parties would be recorded again.

During the period of six months i.e. before moving second motion, both parties have liberty to withdraw their consent for divorce.
After this Court passes an order dissolving the marriage by granting decree of divorce and thereby marriage stands dissolved.

*DIVORCE LAWS

vary from religion to religion in a country with a rich cultural diversity like India. Hindus(which includes Sikh, Jain, Budh) are governed by Hindu Marriage Act,1955. Christians are governed by Indian Divorce Act-1869 & The Indian Christian Marriage Act,1872. Muslims are governed by Personnel laws of Divorce and also the Dissolution of Marriage Act,1939 & The Muslim Women(Protection of Rights on Divorce) Act,1986. Similarly, Parsis are governed by The Parsi Marriage & Divorce Act-1936. And there is also a secular law called Special Marriage Act,1954. A cursory reading of the entire gamut of Indian Laws regarding Divorce makes it clear broadly that the Divorce can be obtained by two ways:

1. Divorce by Mutual Consent

Mutual Consent Divorce is a simple way of coming out of the marriage and dissolves it legally. An important requirement is the mutual consent of the husband & wife. There are two aspects on which Husband & Wife are required to reach a consensus. One is the alimony or maintenance issues. As per Law, there is no minimum or maximum limit of maintenance. It could be any figure or no figure. Next important consideration is the Child Custody. This can also be worked out effectively between the parties. Child Custody in Mutual Consent Divorce can be shared or joint or exclusive depending upon the understanding of the spouses. Duration of Divorce in Mutual Consent varies from one month to six months or more from States to States and as per the High Court directions.

2. Contested Divorce

As the name suggests, you will have to contest it. Indian laws, in general, recognizes cruelty (Physical & Mental), Desertion (Period varies from 2 to 3 years), Unsoundness of mind( of Incurable form), Impotency, renouncing the world, etc. The aggrieved party has to take one of the above grounds for divorce and will have to file the case in the Court of appropriate jurisdiction. Party which files the case has to prove the case with the support of evidence and documents. On successfully proving the case, divorce will be granted and divorce decree will be drawn up accordingly.

ANNULMENT OF MARRIAGE:

Marriage in India can also be dissolved by means of Annulment. Procedure for annulment is same as that of Divorce except that the grounds for annulment are different than that of divorce. Grounds for annulment are fraud, pregnancy of wife by a person other than the husband, impotency prior to the marriage and subsist even at the time of filing the case. Once an annulment is granted by the Indian Court, the status of the parties remains as it was prior to the marriage.

VOID MARRIAGE:

There are certain forms of marriages which are null and void despite the performance /solemnization of the same. Marriage is void under following circumstances:-

a) neither party has a spouse living at the time of the marriage

b) the parties are not within the degrees of prohibited relationship, unless the custom or usage governing each of them permits of a marriage between the two;

c) the parties are not sapindas of each other unless the custom or usage governing each of them permits of a marriage between the two.

The time duration for obtaining divorce varies from case to case & place to place. Generally speaking, contested divorce proceedings take approximately 18 to 24 months. Mutual Consent Divorce varies from 4 weeks to 7 months and more. In Delhi, Mutual Consent Divorce is possible within two to four weeks. Generally speaking procedure for obtaining Divorce in all forms of law (based on religion) is same with only a mild variation.
For More information please contact us:

Consultants for Housing Co-operative Society in Pune
Ved Legal
Email: [email protected] / [email protected]
Mobile: +91 9763040088

*DIVORCE BY MUTUAL CONSENT

Mutual Consent Divorce was brought by the India Parliament vide Amendment in the year 1976 in the Hindu Marriage Act.
Divorce by Mutual Consent means when both Husband and wife has agreed amicably amongst themselves that they cannot live together anymore and that the best solution is to Divorce, without putting forth any allegations against each other, in the court of law, than such a Divorce petition presented jointly before the honorably court, is known as mutual consent Divorce.

It is the quickest form of divorce in India. The Conditions required under Section 13B of the Hindu Marriage Act are as follows:
(i) Husband and wife have been living separately for a period of one year or more,
(ii) That they are unable to live together,
(iii) And that both husband and wife have mutually agreed that the marriage has totally collapsed, hence marriage should be dissolved.

As per law, duration/time of obtaining mutual consent divorce is six months. Although, parties have option of filing the second motion petition any time between six months and eighteen months from the date of the filing of the Mutual Consent Divorce Petition.

PETITION FOR MUTUAL CONSENT DIVORCE CAN BE FILED AT ANY OF THE FOLLOWING PLACE:-
• Place where marriage had taken place
• Place where husband and wife last resided together.
• Place where wife is residing at the time of filing of the Petition

Once petition for divorce by mutual consent is filed, party’s presences are required in the Court for recording of the statement. In the event one of the party is unable to come, such party can appear through power of attorney. Such power of attorney preferably should be a family member of the spouse. Once statement is recorded, it is commonly called First Motion has been granted.
After passing of first motion, parties are called upon to wait for six months period before moving Petition for second motion. This period is extendible unto eighteen months. This six months period in mutual consent divorce is generally called cooling-off period. Six months period are given to parties to think their relationship again. It is given for reconciliation.
After six months period, if parties have been unable to resolve their differences, they will have to appear in the Court again. Statement of parties would be recorded again.

During the period of six months i.e. before moving second motion, both parties have liberty to withdraw their consent for divorce.
After this Court passes an order dissolving the marriage by granting decree of divorce and thereby marriage stands dissolved.

ADVANTAGES OF MUTUAL DIVORCE
Divorce by Mutual consent saves time, money and energy for both, Leaves no room for unnecessary quarrel.

By |October 27th, 2017|consultation on divorce|0 Comments

consultation on divorce

Divorce under Hindu Marriage Act

Under the old Hindu laws, divorce was viewed as forbidden and was not talked about as freely as it is spoken out today, but with the codification of the laws the provision of divorce were laid down The provision of “Divorce” has been dealt with under the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955 as being a true blue method whereby both the parties to the marriage, decide to break all the promises or vows taken at the time of marriage. All Hindus, Buddhist, Jains or Sikhs are covered under the divorce provisions of the act.

Grounds for Divorce
The following grounds can be invoked for securing a divorce under the act:

Adultery: During the period of marriage, if either spouse maintains sexual relations with a person other than his or her lawfully wedded companion.
1. Cruelty: After the marriage, subjecting the petitioner to cruelty.
2. Desertion: If either one of the parties to the marriage deserts the other for a consistent span of at least two years , prior to the filing of the petition by the other party.
3. Conversion to another religion by either party other than Hinduism
4. Mental Disorder: If the spouse of the petitioner suffers from any unsoundness of mind, mental illness or disorder that cannot be cured, then the petitioner can file for divorce
5. Virulent and Incurable Disease: in the form of leprosy.
6. Venerable Disease in Communicable form.
7. The renunciation of the world or entered any religious order.
8. Not heard being alive for a period of seven years or more.

Additional Grounds for Dissolution of the Marriage by the Wife
Under the act, the wife is entitled to seek divorce from her husband on the following grounds:
1. Where the husband has another living wife from his previous subsisting marriage, before the commencement of the act.
2. Post the marriage, the husband was found guilty of rape, sodomy or bestiality.
3. Where the wife was awarded an order or decree for maintenance under section 18 of the Hindu Adoption and Maintenance Act, 1956 or under section 125 of the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1975, by the court, in spite of the fact that she was living apart from her husband even before the passage of such decree or order. The conjugal relations between the parties failed to resume within one year or more, even after the passage of this order.
4. The marriage was performed before the attainment of 15 years of age by the wife, and on completion of 15 years and not before 18 years of age, the wife rejected the marriage Under the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955, a divorce petition can be filed by the parties only after the passage of one year from the marriage date.

The Irretrievable breakdown of Marriage
The Marriage Laws (Amendment) Bill, 2010 incorporated another ground for seeking divorce, namely the ‘Irretrievable breakdown of marriage’ under the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955 and the Special Marriage Act, 1954. As the term suggests, it leads to a situation whereby, either or both the parties to the marriage fine it impossible to peacefully cohabit with each other, due to personality’s clashes, differences in opinion and have lived separately from each other for a long period of time and are no longer too eager to further carry on their matrimonial relationship.

Section 13B in the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955
*13B DIVORCE BY MUTUAL CONSENT —

(1) Subject to the provisions of this Act a petition for dissolution of marriage by a decree of divorce may be presented to the district court by both the parties to a marriage together, whether such marriage was solemnized before or after the commencement of the Marriage Laws (Amendment) Act, 1976 (68 of 1976)*, on the ground that they have been living separately for a period of one year or more, that they have not been able to live together and that they have mutually agreed that the marriage should be dissolved.

(2) On the motion of both the parties made not earlier than six months after the date of the presentation of the petition referred to in sub-section (1) and not later than eighteen months after the said date, if the petition is not withdrawn in the meantime, the court shall, on being satisfied, after hearing the parties and after making such inquiry as it thinks fit, that a marriage has been solemnized and that the averments in the petition are true, pass a decree of divorce declaring the marriage to be dissolved with effect from the date of the decree.]

(i) The period of 6 to 18 months provided in section 13B is a period of interregnum which is intended to give time and opportunity to the parties to reflect on their move. In this transitional period the parties or either of them may have second thoughts; Suman v. Surendra Kumar, AIR 2003 Raj 155.

(ii) The period of living separately for one year must be immediately preceding the presentation of petition. The expression ‘living separately’ connotes not living like husband and wife. It has no reference to the place of living. The parties may live under the same roof and yet they may not be living as husband and wife. The parties should have no desire to perform marital obligations; Sureshta Devi v. Om Prakash, AIR 1992 SC 1904.

(iii) The period of six to eighteen months time is given in divorce by mutual consent as to give time and opportunity to the parties to reflect on their move and seek advice from relations and friends. Mutual consent should continue till the divorce decree is passed. The court should be satisfied about the bona fides and consent of the parties. If there is no consent at the time of enquiry the court gets no jurisdiction to make a decree for divorce. If the court is held to have the power to make a decree solely based on the initial petition, it negates the whole idea of mutuality. There can be unilateral withdrawal of consent. Held, that since consent of the wife was obtained by fraud and wife was not willing to consent, there could be unilateral withdrawal, of consent; Sureshta Devi v. Om Prakash, AIR 1992 SC 1904.

*PROCEDURE FOR MUTUAL CONSENT DIVORCE
Mutual Consent Divorce was brought by the India Parliament vide Amendment in the year 1976 in the Hindu Marriage Act.
As per law, duration/time of obtaining mutual consent divorce is six months. Although, parties have option of filing the second motion petition any time between six months and eighteen months from the date of the filing of the Mutual Consent Divorce Petition.

As a mutual consent divorce lawyers, we “VED LEGAL” provide platform to parties to discuss these issues in calm atmosphere and reach to their own solutions. We provide different options using our vast experience in the field to resolve issues affecting the chances of settlement.

Petition for mutual consent divorce can be filed at any of the following place:-
• Place where marriage had taken place
• Place where husband and wife last resided together.
• Place where wife is residing at the time of filing of the Petition
Once petition for divorce by mutual consent is filed, parties presence are required in the Court for recording of the statement. In the event one of the party is unable to come, such party can appear through power of attorney. Such power of attorney preferably should be a family member of the spouse. Once statement is recorded, it is commonly called First Motion has been granted.

After passing of first motion, parties are called upon to wait for six months period before moving Petition for second motion. This period is extendible unto eighteen months. This six months period in mutual consent divorce is generally called cooling-off period. Six months period are given to parties to think over their relationship again. It is given for reconciliation.

After six months period, if parties have been unable to resolve their differences, they will have to appear in the Court again. Statement of parties would be recorded again.
During the period of six months i.e. before moving second motion, both parties have liberty to withdraw their consent for divorce.
After this Court passes an order dissolving the marriage by granting decree of divorce and thereby marriage stands dissolved.

*DIVORCE LAWS

vary from religion to religion in a country with a rich cultural diversity like India. Hindus(which includes Sikh, Jain, Budh) are governed by Hindu Marriage Act,1955. Christians are governed by Indian Divorce Act-1869 & The Indian Christian Marriage Act,1872. Muslims are governed by Personnel laws of Divorce and also the Dissolution of Marriage Act,1939 & The Muslim Women(Protection of Rights on Divorce) Act,1986. Similarly, Parsis are governed by The Parsi Marriage & Divorce Act-1936. And there is also a secular law called Special Marriage Act,1954. A cursory reading of the entire gamut of Indian Laws regarding Divorce makes it clear broadly that the Divorce can be obtained by two ways:

1. Divorce by Mutual Consent

Mutual Consent Divorce is a simple way of coming out of the marriage and dissolves it legally. An important requirement is the mutual consent of the husband & wife. There are two aspects on which Husband & Wife are required to reach a consensus. One is the alimony or maintenance issues. As per Law, there is no minimum or maximum limit of maintenance. It could be any figure or no figure. Next important consideration is the Child Custody. This can also be worked out effectively between the parties. Child Custody in Mutual Consent Divorce can be shared or joint or exclusive depending upon the understanding of the spouses. Duration of Divorce in Mutual Consent varies from one month to six months or more from States to States and as per the High Court directions.

2. Contested Divorce

As the name suggests, you will have to contest it. Indian laws, in general, recognizes cruelty (Physical & Mental), Desertion (Period varies from 2 to 3 years), Unsoundness of mind( of Incurable form), Impotency, renouncing the world, etc. The aggrieved party has to take one of the above grounds for divorce and will have to file the case in the Court of appropriate jurisdiction. Party which files the case has to prove the case with the support of evidence and documents. On successfully proving the case, divorce will be granted and divorce decree will be drawn up accordingly.

ANNULMENT OF MARRIAGE:

Marriage in India can also be dissolved by means of Annulment. Procedure for annulment is same as that of Divorce except that the grounds for annulment are different than that of divorce. Grounds for annulment are fraud, pregnancy of wife by a person other than the husband, impotency prior to the marriage and subsist even at the time of filing the case. Once an annulment is granted by the Indian Court, the status of the parties remains as it was prior to the marriage.

VOID MARRIAGE:

There are certain forms of marriages which are null and void despite the performance /solemnization of the same. Marriage is void under following circumstances:-

a) neither party has a spouse living at the time of the marriage

b) the parties are not within the degrees of prohibited relationship, unless the custom or usage governing each of them permits of a marriage between the two;

c) the parties are not sapindas of each other unless the custom or usage governing each of them permits of a marriage between the two.

The time duration for obtaining divorce varies from case to case & place to place. Generally speaking, contested divorce proceedings take approximately 18 to 24 months. Mutual Consent Divorce varies from 4 weeks to 7 months and more. In Delhi, Mutual Consent Divorce is possible within two to four weeks. Generally speaking procedure for obtaining Divorce in all forms of law (based on religion) is same with only a mild variation.
For More information please contact us:

Consultants for Housing Co-operative Society in Pune
Ved Legal
Email: [email protected] / [email protected]
Mobile: +91 9763040088

*DIVORCE BY MUTUAL CONSENT

Mutual Consent Divorce was brought by the India Parliament vide Amendment in the year 1976 in the Hindu Marriage Act.
Divorce by Mutual Consent means when both Husband and wife has agreed amicably amongst themselves that they cannot live together anymore and that the best solution is to Divorce, without putting forth any allegations against each other, in the court of law, than such a Divorce petition presented jointly before the honorably court, is known as mutual consent Divorce.
It is the quickest form of divorce in India. The Conditions required under Section 13B of the Hindu Marriage Act are as follows:
(i) Husband and wife have been living separately for a period of one year or more,
(ii) That they are unable to live together,
(iii) And that both husband and wife have mutually agreed that the marriage has totally collapsed, hence marriage should be dissolved.

As per law, duration/time of obtaining mutual consent divorce is six months. Although, parties have option of filing the second motion petition any time between six months and eighteen months from the date of the filing of the Mutual Consent Divorce Petition.

PETITION FOR MUTUAL CONSENT DIVORCE CAN BE FILED AT ANY OF THE FOLLOWING PLACE:-
• Place where marriage had taken place
• Place where husband and wife last resided together.
• Place where wife is residing at the time of filing of the Petition

Once petition for divorce by mutual consent is filed, party’s presences are required in the Court for recording of the statement. In the event one of the party is unable to come, such party can appear through power of attorney. Such power of attorney preferably should be a family member of the spouse. Once statement is recorded, it is commonly called First Motion has been granted.

After passing of first motion, parties are called upon to wait for six months period before moving Petition for second motion. This period is extendible unto eighteen months. This six months period in mutual consent divorce is generally called cooling-off period. Six months period are given to parties to think their relationship again. It is given for reconciliation.

After six months period, if parties have been unable to resolve their differences, they will have to appear in the Court again. Statement of parties would be recorded again.
During the period of six months i.e. before moving second motion, both parties have liberty to withdraw their consent for divorce.
After this Court passes an order dissolving the marriage by granting decree of divorce and thereby marriage stands dissolved.

ADVANTAGES OF MUTUAL DIVORCE
Divorce by Mutual consent saves time, money and energy for both, Leaves no room for unnecessary quarrel.

By |October 14th, 2017|consultation on divorce|0 Comments

Consultation on Divorce

Divorce under Hindu Marriage Act

Under the old Hindu laws, divorce was viewed as forbidden and was not talked about as freely as it is spoken out today, but with the codification of the laws the provision of divorce were laid down The provision of “Divorce” has been dealt with under the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955 as being a true blue method whereby both the parties to the marriage, decide to break all the promises or vows taken at the time of marriage. All Hindus, Buddhist, Jains or Sikhs are covered under the divorce provisions of the act.

Grounds for Divorce
The following grounds can be invoked for securing a divorce under the act:

Adultery: During the period of marriage, if either spouse maintains sexual relations with a person other than his or her lawfully wedded companion.
1. Cruelty: After the marriage, subjecting the petitioner to cruelty.
2. Desertion: If either one of the parties to the marriage deserts the other for a consistent span of at least two years , prior to the filing of the petition by the other party.
3. Conversion to another religion by either party other than Hinduism
4. Mental Disorder: If the spouse of the petitioner suffers from any unsoundness of mind, mental illness or disorder that cannot be cured, then the petitioner can file for divorce
5. Virulent and Incurable Disease: in the form of leprosy.
6. Venerable Disease in Communicable form.
7. The renunciation of the world or entered any religious order.
8. Not heard being alive for a period of seven years or more.

Additional Grounds for Dissolution of the Marriage by the Wife
Under the act, the wife is entitled to seek divorce from her husband on the following grounds:
1. Where the husband has another living wife from his previous subsisting marriage, before the commencement of the act.
2. Post the marriage, the husband was found guilty of rape, sodomy or bestiality.
3. Where the wife was awarded an order or decree for maintenance under section 18 of the Hindu Adoption and Maintenance Act, 1956 or under section 125 of the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1975, by the court, in spite of the fact that she was living apart from her husband even before the passage of such decree or order. The conjugal relations between the parties failed to resume within one year or more, even after the passage of this order.
4. The marriage was performed before the attainment of 15 years of age by the wife, and on completion of 15 years and not before 18 years of age, the wife rejected the marriage Under the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955, a divorce petition can be filed by the parties only after the passage of one year from the marriage date.

The Irretrievable breakdown of Marriage
The Marriage Laws (Amendment) Bill, 2010 incorporated another ground for seeking divorce, namely the ‘Irretrievable breakdown of marriage’ under the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955 and the Special Marriage Act, 1954. As the term suggests, it leads to a situation whereby, either or both the parties to the marriage fine it impossible to peacefully cohabit with each other, due to personality’s clashes, differences in opinion and have lived separately from each other for a long period of time and are no longer too eager to further carry on their matrimonial relationship.

Section 13B in the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955
*13B DIVORCE BY MUTUAL CONSENT —

(1) Subject to the provisions of this Act a petition for dissolution of marriage by a decree of divorce may be presented to the district court by both the parties to a marriage together, whether such marriage was solemnized before or after the commencement of the Marriage Laws (Amendment) Act, 1976 (68 of 1976)*, on the ground that they have been living separately for a period of one year or more, that they have not been able to live together and that they have mutually agreed that the marriage should be dissolved.

(2) On the motion of both the parties made not earlier than six months after the date of the presentation of the petition referred to in sub-section (1) and not later than eighteen months after the said date, if the petition is not withdrawn in the meantime, the court shall, on being satisfied, after hearing the parties and after making such inquiry as it thinks fit, that a marriage has been solemnized and that the averments in the petition are true, pass a decree of divorce declaring the marriage to be dissolved with effect from the date of the decree.]

(i) The period of 6 to 18 months provided in section 13B is a period of interregnum which is intended to give time and opportunity to the parties to reflect on their move. In this transitional period the parties or either of them may have second thoughts; Suman v. Surendra Kumar, AIR 2003 Raj 155.

(ii) The period of living separately for one year must be immediately preceding the presentation of petition. The expression ‘living separately’ connotes not living like husband and wife. It has no reference to the place of living. The parties may live under the same roof and yet they may not be living as husband and wife. The parties should have no desire to perform marital obligations; Sureshta Devi v. Om Prakash, AIR 1992 SC 1904.

(iii) The period of six to eighteen months time is given in divorce by mutual consent as to give time and opportunity to the parties to reflect on their move and seek advice from relations and friends. Mutual consent should continue till the divorce decree is passed. The court should be satisfied about the bona fides and consent of the parties. If there is no consent at the time of enquiry the court gets no jurisdiction to make a decree for divorce. If the court is held to have the power to make a decree solely based on the initial petition, it negates the whole idea of mutuality. There can be unilateral withdrawal of consent. Held, that since consent of the wife was obtained by fraud and wife was not willing to consent, there could be unilateral withdrawal, of consent; Sureshta Devi v. Om Prakash, AIR 1992 SC 1904.

*PROCEDURE FOR MUTUAL CONSENT DIVORCE
Mutual Consent Divorce was brought by the India Parliament vide Amendment in the year 1976 in the Hindu Marriage Act.
As per law, duration/time of obtaining mutual consent divorce is six months. Although, parties have option of filing the second motion petition any time between six months and eighteen months from the date of the filing of the Mutual Consent Divorce Petition.
As a mutual consent divorce lawyers, we “VED LEGAL” provide platform to parties to discuss these issues in calm atmosphere and reach to their own solutions. We provide different options using our vast experience in the field to resolve issues affecting the chances of settlement.

Petition for mutual consent divorce can be filed at any of the following place:-
• Place where marriage had taken place
• Place where husband and wife last resided together.
• Place where wife is residing at the time of filing of the Petition
Once petition for divorce by mutual consent is filed, parties presence are required in the Court for recording of the statement. In the event one of the party is unable to come, such party can appear through power of attorney. Such power of attorney preferably should be a family member of the spouse. Once statement is recorded, it is commonly called First Motion has been granted.

After passing of first motion, parties are called upon to wait for six months period before moving Petition for second motion. This period is extendible unto eighteen months. This six months period in mutual consent divorce is generally called cooling-off period. Six months period are given to parties to think over their relationship again. It is given for reconciliation.
After six months period, if parties have been unable to resolve their differences, they will have to appear in the Court again. Statement of parties would be recorded again.

During the period of six months i.e. before moving second motion, both parties have liberty to withdraw their consent for divorce.
After this Court passes an order dissolving the marriage by granting decree of divorce and thereby marriage stands dissolved.

*DIVORCE LAWS

vary from religion to religion in a country with a rich cultural diversity like India. Hindus(which includes Sikh, Jain, Budh) are governed by Hindu Marriage Act,1955. Christians are governed by Indian Divorce Act-1869 & The Indian Christian Marriage Act,1872. Muslims are governed by Personnel laws of Divorce and also the Dissolution of Marriage Act,1939 & The Muslim Women(Protection of Rights on Divorce) Act,1986. Similarly, Parsis are governed by The Parsi Marriage & Divorce Act-1936. And there is also a secular law called Special Marriage Act,1954. A cursory reading of the entire gamut of Indian Laws regarding Divorce makes it clear broadly that the Divorce can be obtained by two ways:

1. Divorce by Mutual Consent

Mutual Consent Divorce is a simple way of coming out of the marriage and dissolves it legally. An important requirement is the mutual consent of the husband & wife. There are two aspects on which Husband & Wife are required to reach a consensus. One is the alimony or maintenance issues. As per Law, there is no minimum or maximum limit of maintenance. It could be any figure or no figure. Next important consideration is the Child Custody. This can also be worked out effectively between the parties. Child Custody in Mutual Consent Divorce can be shared or joint or exclusive depending upon the understanding of the spouses. Duration of Divorce in Mutual Consent varies from one month to six months or more from States to States and as per the High Court directions.

2. Contested Divorce

As the name suggests, you will have to contest it. Indian laws, in general, recognizes cruelty (Physical & Mental), Desertion (Period varies from 2 to 3 years), Unsoundness of mind( of Incurable form), Impotency, renouncing the world, etc. The aggrieved party has to take one of the above grounds for divorce and will have to file the case in the Court of appropriate jurisdiction. Party which files the case has to prove the case with the support of evidence and documents. On successfully proving the case, divorce will be granted and divorce decree will be drawn up accordingly.

ANNULMENT OF MARRIAGE:

Marriage in India can also be dissolved by means of Annulment. Procedure for annulment is same as that of Divorce except that the grounds for annulment are different than that of divorce. Grounds for annulment are fraud, pregnancy of wife by a person other than the husband, impotency prior to the marriage and subsist even at the time of filing the case. Once an annulment is granted by the Indian Court, the status of the parties remains as it was prior to the marriage.

VOID MARRIAGE:

There are certain forms of marriages which are null and void despite the performance /solemnization of the same. Marriage is void under following circumstances:-

a) neither party has a spouse living at the time of the marriage

b) the parties are not within the degrees of prohibited relationship, unless the custom or usage governing each of them permits of a marriage between the two;

c) the parties are not sapindas of each other unless the custom or usage governing each of them permits of a marriage between the two.

The time duration for obtaining divorce varies from case to case & place to place. Generally speaking, contested divorce proceedings take approximately 18 to 24 months. Mutual Consent Divorce varies from 4 weeks to 7 months and more. In Delhi, Mutual Consent Divorce is possible within two to four weeks. Generally speaking procedure for obtaining Divorce in all forms of law (based on religion) is same with only a mild variation.
For More information please contact us:

Consultants for Housing Co-operative Society in Pune
Ved Legal
Email: [email protected] / [email protected]
Mobile: +91 9763040088

*DIVORCE BY MUTUAL CONSENT

Mutual Consent Divorce was brought by the India Parliament vide Amendment in the year 1976 in the Hindu Marriage Act.
Divorce by Mutual Consent means when both Husband and wife has agreed amicably amongst themselves that they cannot live together anymore and that the best solution is to Divorce, without putting forth any allegations against each other, in the court of law, than such a Divorce petition presented jointly before the honorably court, is known as mutual consent Divorce.

It is the quickest form of divorce in India. The Conditions required under Section 13B of the Hindu Marriage Act are as follows:
(i) Husband and wife have been living separately for a period of one year or more,
(ii) That they are unable to live together,
(iii) And that both husband and wife have mutually agreed that the marriage has totally collapsed, hence marriage should be dissolved.

As per law, duration/time of obtaining mutual consent divorce is six months. Although, parties have option of filing the second motion petition any time between six months and eighteen months from the date of the filing of the Mutual Consent Divorce Petition.

PETITION FOR MUTUAL CONSENT DIVORCE CAN BE FILED AT ANY OF THE FOLLOWING PLACE:-
• Place where marriage had taken place
• Place where husband and wife last resided together.
• Place where wife is residing at the time of filing of the Petition

Once petition for divorce by mutual consent is filed, party’s presences are required in the Court for recording of the statement. In the event one of the party is unable to come, such party can appear through power of attorney. Such power of attorney preferably should be a family member of the spouse. Once statement is recorded, it is commonly called First Motion has been granted.

After passing of first motion, parties are called upon to wait for six months period before moving Petition for second motion. This period is extendible unto eighteen months. This six months period in mutual consent divorce is generally called cooling-off period. Six months period are given to parties to think their relationship again. It is given for reconciliation.
After six months period, if parties have been unable to resolve their differences, they will have to appear in the Court again. Statement of parties would be recorded again.

During the period of six months i.e. before moving second motion, both parties have liberty to withdraw their consent for divorce.
After this Court passes an order dissolving the marriage by granting decree of divorce and thereby marriage stands dissolved.
ADVANTAGES OF MUTUAL DIVORCE
Divorce by Mutual consent saves time, money and energy for both, Leaves no room for unnecessary quarrel.

By |September 25th, 2017|consultation on divorce|0 Comments

Consultation on Divorce

Divorce under Hindu Marriage Act

Under the old Hindu laws, divorce was viewed as forbidden and was not talked about as freely as it is spoken out today, but with the codification of the laws the provision of divorce were laid down The provision of “Divorce” has been dealt with under the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955 as being a true blue method whereby both the parties to the marriage, decide to break all the promises or vows taken at the time of marriage. All Hindus, Buddhist, Jains or Sikhs are covered under the divorce provisions of the act.

Grounds for Divorce
The following grounds can be invoked for securing a divorce under the act:

Adultery: During the period of marriage, if either spouse maintains sexual relations with a person other than his or her lawfully wedded companion.
1. Cruelty: After the marriage, subjecting the petitioner to cruelty.
2. Desertion: If either one of the parties to the marriage deserts the other for a consistent span of at least two years , prior to the filing of the petition by the other party.
3. Conversion to another religion by either party other than Hinduism
4. Mental Disorder: If the spouse of the petitioner suffers from any unsoundness of mind, mental illness or disorder that cannot be cured, then the petitioner can file for divorce
5. Virulent and Incurable Disease: in the form of leprosy.
6. Venerable Disease in Communicable form.
7. The renunciation of the world or entered any religious order.
8. Not heard being alive for a period of seven years or more.

Additional Grounds for Dissolution of the Marriage by the Wife
Under the act, the wife is entitled to seek divorce from her husband on the following grounds:

1. Where the husband has another living wife from his previous subsisting marriage, before the commencement of the act.

2. Post the marriage, the husband was found guilty of rape, sodomy or bestiality.

3. Where the wife was awarded an order or decree for maintenance under section 18 of the Hindu Adoption and Maintenance Act, 1956 or under section 125 of the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1975, by the court, in spite of the fact that she was living apart from her husband even before the passage of such decree or order. The conjugal relations between the parties failed to resume within one year or more, even after the passage of this order.

4. The marriage was performed before the attainment of 15 years of age by the wife, and on completion of 15 years and not before 18 years of age, the wife rejected the marriage Under the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955, a divorce petition can be filed by the parties only after the passage of one year from the marriage date.

The Irretrievable breakdown of Marriage
The Marriage Laws (Amendment) Bill, 2010 incorporated another ground for seeking divorce, namely the ‘Irretrievable breakdown of marriage’ under the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955 and the Special Marriage Act, 1954. As the term suggests, it leads to a situation whereby, either or both the parties to the marriage fine it impossible to peacefully cohabit with each other, due to personality’s clashes, differences in opinion and have lived separately from each other for a long period of time and are no longer too eager to further carry on their matrimonial relationship.

Section 13B in the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955
*13B DIVORCE BY MUTUAL CONSENT —

(1) Subject to the provisions of this Act a petition for dissolution of marriage by a decree of divorce may be presented to the district court by both the parties to a marriage together, whether such marriage was solemnized before or after the commencement of the Marriage Laws (Amendment) Act, 1976 (68 of 1976)*, on the ground that they have been living separately for a period of one year or more, that they have not been able to live together and that they have mutually agreed that the marriage should be dissolved.

(2) On the motion of both the parties made not earlier than six months after the date of the presentation of the petition referred to in sub-section (1) and not later than eighteen months after the said date, if the petition is not withdrawn in the meantime, the court shall, on being satisfied, after hearing the parties and after making such inquiry as it thinks fit, that a marriage has been solemnized and that the averments in the petition are true, pass a decree of divorce declaring the marriage to be dissolved with effect from the date of the decree.]

(i) The period of 6 to 18 months provided in section 13B is a period of interregnum which is intended to give time and opportunity to the parties to reflect on their move. In this transitional period the parties or either of them may have second thoughts; Suman v. Surendra Kumar, AIR 2003 Raj 155.

(ii) The period of living separately for one year must be immediately preceding the presentation of petition. The expression ‘living separately’ connotes not living like husband and wife. It has no reference to the place of living. The parties may live under the same roof and yet they may not be living as husband and wife. The parties should have no desire to perform marital obligations; Sureshta Devi v. Om Prakash, AIR 1992 SC 1904.

(iii) The period of six to eighteen months time is given in divorce by mutual consent as to give time and opportunity to the parties to reflect on their move and seek advice from relations and friends. Mutual consent should continue till the divorce decree is passed. The court should be satisfied about the bona fides and consent of the parties. If there is no consent at the time of enquiry the court gets no jurisdiction to make a decree for divorce. If the court is held to have the power to make a decree solely based on the initial petition, it negates the whole idea of mutuality. There can be unilateral withdrawal of consent. Held, that since consent of the wife was obtained by fraud and wife was not willing to consent, there could be unilateral withdrawal, of consent; Sureshta Devi v. Om Prakash, AIR 1992 SC 1904.

By |September 18th, 2017|consultation on divorce|0 Comments

Best Lawyers for Divorce in Pune

Ved legal is Associated with expertise Advocates in Divorce and Matrimonial Cases in and around Pune, and have vast experience in the Family issues which arises after marriage, Ved legal gives the proper consultation with the concrete solution to their clients, so that they can settle their dispute amicably. Below is the brief description of the jurisdiction and procedure followed in Family Court.

Introduction

Marriage is an institution which is considered as sacred in India. But with the changing times marriage has become a subject of great judicial scrutiny. Before 1984 all family matters were seen by ordinary civil court judges who used to deal with matters like recovery of money or property. In 1984 the Government of India after the recommendation of the Law Commission in their 59th Report the family courts were created by a Gazette notification of the Central Government. This Act was known as ‘The Family Courts Act, 1984’.

Jurisdiction

  1. Civil matters

The family courts exercise the entire jurisdiction which is exercised by any District Court or any subordinate civil court in the following matters-

  • Matrimonial causes
  • Maintenance and alimony of spouses
  • Custody and guardianship of children
  • Settlement of spousal property
  1. Criminal matters

The judge is vested with the power exercisable by the Magistrate of First Class under Chapter IX of Code of Criminal Procedure section 125 which is Order for maintenance of wives, children and parents.

Powers of Family Court

  1. The family court has the power to make their own procedure.
  2. They are not required to record the oral statement of the witness at length.
  3. The appeal from family courts lies directly to the High Court.
  4. The Family Court can receive any document or statement even if it is not admissible under Indian Evidence Act 1872.

 

Procedure to be followed by family court

  1. Section 9 provides that the family court should try to resolve the matter through conciliation and settlement.
  2. If there is possibility of settlement of dispute the court should adjourn the proceedings until such settlement is arrived at.
  3. The parties of the proceeding are not required to hire a legal practitioner; however they are entitled to appoint an ‘amicus curie’ to assist the parties in the settlement proceedings.
  4. In camera proceedings can be ordered if the parties desire. (In camera proceedings means that the public is not allowed to see the proceedings)
  5. Judgment should be concise with the statement of the case, determination of the decision and the reason for the decision.
  6. Provisions of Code of Civil Procedure, 1908 are applied in the enforcement of the order or the judgment.
  7. The Court can take assistance of medical and welfare experts.

Appeal                                             

  1. Appeal from judgment or order of Family Court can be made to the High Court within 30 days of passing the order or the judgment.
  2. The appeal can be on both question of law and question of fact.
  3. The appeal should be heard by a High Court bench of two or more judges.
  4. No appeal lies against an order which is passed with the consent of the parties.

Steps to follow for registering a suit in a Family Court

  1. If a person wants to register a suit in the family court then he needs to describe all the details clearly on a watermarked paper and submitted along with the court fees.
  2. Along with the suit papers the petitioner should attach an affidavit that all the facts stated in the plaint is true.
  3. The papers are submitted to the registrar of the Family Court who verifies all the relevant documents.
  4. These files are presented to the Principal Judge of the Family Court. After verification of each file and hearing the petitioners, the Principal Judge decides whether the suit is fit for registration.
  5. The applicant files the summons form and gets the next date for hearing.

 

consultants for Divorce in pune

Ved legal is Associated with expertise consultants in Divorce and Matrimonial Cases in and around Pune, and have vast experience in the Family related issues which arises after marriage, Ved legal gives the proper consultation with the concrete solution to their clients, so that they can settle their dispute amicably. Below is the brief description of Divorce Law

Matrimonial and Divorce Law

Divorce laws vary from religion to religion in a country with a rich cultural diversity like India. Hindus(which includes Sikh, Jain, Budh) are governed by Hindu Marriage Act,1955. Christians are governed by Indian Divorce Act-1869 & The Indian Christian Marriage Act,1872. Muslims are governed by Personnel laws of Divorce and also the Dissolution of Marriage Act,1939 & The Muslim Women(Protection of Rights on Divorce) Act,1986. Similarly, Parsis are governed by The Parsi Marriage & Divorce Act-1936. And there is also a secular law called Special Marriage Act,1954. A cursory reading of the entire gamut of Indian Laws regarding Divorce makes it clear broadly that the Divorce can be obtained by two ways:

1. Divorce by Mutual Consent

Mutual Consent Divorce is a simple way of coming out of the marriage and dissolves it legally. An important requirement is the mutual consent of the husband & wife. There are two aspects on which Husband & Wife are required to reach a consensus. One is the alimony or maintenance issues. As per Law, there is no minimum or maximum limit of maintenance. It could be any figure or no figure. Next important consideration is the Child Custody. This can also be worked out effectively between the parties. Child Custody in Mutual Consent Divorce can be shared or joint or exclusive depending upon the understanding of the spouses. Duration of Divorce in Mutual Consent varies from one month to six months or more from States to States and as per the High Court directions.

2. Contested Divorce
As the name suggests, you will have to contest it. Indian laws, in general, recognizes cruelty (Physical & Mental), Desertion (Period varies from 2 to 3 years), Unsoundness of mind( of Incurable form), Impotency, renouncing the world, etc. The aggrieved party has to take one of the above grounds for divorce and will have to file the case in the Court of appropriate jurisdiction. Party which files the case has to prove the case with the support of evidence and documents. On successfully proving the case, divorce will be granted and divorce decree will be drawn up accordingly.

ANNULMENT OF MARRIAGE:

Marriage in India can also be dissolved by means of Annulment. Procedure for annulment is same as that of Divorce except that the grounds for annulment are different than that of divorce. Grounds for annulment are fraud, pregnancy of wife by a person other than the husband, impotency prior to the marriage and subsist even at the time of filing the case. Once an annulment is granted by the Indian Court, the status of the parties remains as it was prior to the marriage.

VOID MARRIAGE:
There are certain forms of marriages which are null and void despite the performance /solemnization of the same. Marriage is void under following circumstances:-
a) neither party has a spouse living at the time of the marriage
b) the parties are not within the degrees of prohibited relationship, unless the custom or usage governing each of them permits of a marriage between the two;
c) the parties are not sapindas of each other unless the custom or usage governing each of them permits of a marriage between the two.

The time duration for obtaining divorce varies from case to case & place to place. Generally speaking, contested divorce proceedings take approximately 18 to 24 months. Mutual Consent Divorce varies from 4 weeks to 7 months and more. In Delhi, Mutual Consent Divorce is possible within two to four weeks. Generally speaking procedure for obtaining Divorce in all forms of law (based on religion) is same with only a mild variation.

For More information please contact us:
Consultants for Housing Co-operative Society in Pune
Ved Legal
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