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Advocates for divorce in pune

Section 13B in the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955

13B Divorce by mutual consent —

(1) Subject to the provisions of this Act a petition for dissolution of marriage by a decree of divorce may be presented to the district court by both the parties to a marriage together, whether such marriage was solemnized before or after the commencement of the Marriage Laws (Amendment) Act, 1976 (68 of 1976)*, on the ground that they have been living separately for a period of one year or more, that they have not been able to live together and that they have mutually agreed that the marriage should be dissolved.

(2) On the motion of both the parties made not earlier than six months after the date of the presentation of the petition referred to in sub-section (1) and not later than eighteen months after the said date, if the petition is not withdrawn in the meantime, the court shall, on being satisfied, after hearing the parties and after making such inquiry as it thinks fit, that a marriage has been solemnized and that the averments in the petition are true, pass a decree of divorce declaring the marriage to be dissolved with effect from the date of the decree.]

(i) The period of 6 to 18 months provided in section 13B is a period of interregnum which is intended to give time and opportunity to the parties to reflect on their move. In this transitional period the parties or either of them may have second thoughts; Suman v. Surendra Kumar, AIR 2003 Raj 155.

(ii) The period of living separately for one year must be immediately preceding the presentation of petition. The expression ‘living separately’ connotes not living like husband and wife. It has no reference to the place of living. The parties may live under the same roof and yet they may not be living as husband and wife. The parties should have no desire to perform marital obligations; Sureshta Devi v. Om Prakash, AIR 1992 SC 1904.

(iii) The period of six to eighteen months time is given in divorce by mutual consent as to give time and opportunity to the parties to reflect on their move and seek advice from relations and friends. Mutual consent should continue till the divorce decree is passed. The court should be satisfied about the bona fides and consent of the parties. If there is no consent at the time of enquiry the court gets no jurisdiction to make a decree for divorce. If the court is held to have the power to make a decree solely based on the initial petition, it negates the whole idea of mutuality. There can be unilateral withdrawal of consent. Held, that since consent of the wife was obtained by fraud and wife was not willing to consent, there could be unilateral withdrawal, of consent; Sureshta Devi v. Om Prakash, AIR 1992 SC 1904.

By |August 21st, 2017|Advocates for divorce in pune|0 Comments

Advocates For Divorce In Pune

According to Section 13 of Hindu Marriage Act, 1955 lays down as under:
Section 13. Divorce – (1) Any marriage solemnized, whether before or after the commencement of this Act, may, on a petition presented by either the husband or the wife, be dissolved by a decree of divorce on the ground that the other party:-
i) is living in adultery; or
ii) has ceased to be a Hindu by conversion to another religion; or
iii) has been incurably of unsound mind for a continuous period of not less than three years immediately preceding the presentation of the petition; or
iv) has, for a period of not less than three years immediately preceding the presentation of the petition, been suffering from a virulent and incurable form of leprosy; or
v) had, for a period of not less than three years immediately preceding the presentation of the petition, been suffering from venereal disease in a communicable form; or
vi) has renounced the world by entering any religious order; or
vii) has not been heard of as being alive for a period of seven years or more by those persons who would naturally have heard of it, had that party been alive; or
viii) has not resumed cohabitation for a space of two years or upwards after the passing of a decree for judicial separation against that party; or
ix) has failed to comply with a decree for restitution of conjugal rights for a period of two years or upwards after the passing of the decree.
(2) A wife may also present a petition for the dissolution of her marriage by a decree of divorce on the ground:-
i) in the case of any marriage solemnized before the commencement of this Act, that the husband had married again before such commencement or that any other wife of the husband married before such commencement was alive at the time of the solemnization of the marriage of the petitioner:
Provided that in either case the other wife is alive at the time of the presentation of the petition; or
ii) that the husband has, since the solemnization of the marriage, been guilty of rape, sodomy or bestiality.
Section 13 of the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955, describes the following grounds of divorce as under:
Adultery
Conversion
Mental disorder/Unsound Mind
Leprosy
Venereal disease
Renounced the World
Not heard alive for seven years
Judicial Separation
No Resumption of Co-habitation
Cruelty Now we will discuss each ground in details with the decided cases of Supreme Court and All the High Court’s of India.

By |May 23rd, 2017|Advocates for divorce in pune|0 Comments

Advocates for divorce in pune

DIVORCE BY MUTUAL CONSENT

Mutual Consent Divorce was brought by the India Parliament vide Amendment in the year 1976 in the Hindu Marriage Act.

Divorce by Mutual Consent means when both Husband and wife has agreed amicably amongst themselves that they cannot live together anymore and that the best solution is to Divorce, without putting forth any allegations against each other, in the court of law, than such a Divorce petition presented jointly before the honorably court, is known as mutual consent Divorce.

It is the quickest form of divorce in India. The Conditions required under Section 13B of the Hindu Marriage Act are as follows:

(i) Husband and wife have been living separately for a period of one year or more,
(ii) That they are unable to live together,
(iii) And that both husband and wife have mutually agreed that the marriage has totally collapsed, hence marriage should be dissolved.

As per law, duration/time of obtaining mutual consent divorce is six months. Although, parties have option of filing the second motion petition any time between six months and eighteen months from the date of the filing of the Mutual Consent Divorce Petition.

PETITION FOR MUTUAL CONSENT DIVORCE CAN BE FILED AT ANY OF THE FOLLOWING PLACE:-
• Place where marriage had taken place
• Place where husband and wife last resided together.
• Place where wife is residing at the time of filing of the Petition

Once petition for divorce by mutual consent is filed, party’s presences are required in the Court for recording of the statement. In the event one of the party is unable to come, such party can appear through power of attorney. Such power of attorney preferably should be a family member of the spouse. Once statement is recorded, it is commonly called First Motion has been granted.

After passing of first motion, parties are called upon to wait for six months period before moving Petition for second motion. This period is extendible unto eighteen months. This six months period in mutual consent divorce is generally called cooling-off period. Six months period are given to parties to think their relationship again. It is given for reconciliation.

After six months period, if parties have been unable to resolve their differences, they will have to appear in the Court again. Statement of parties would be recorded again.

During the period of six months i.e. before moving second motion, both parties have liberty to withdraw their consent for divorce.

After this Court passes an order dissolving the marriage by granting decree of divorce and thereby marriage stands dissolved.

ADVANTAGES OF MUTUAL DIVORCE

Divorce by Mutual consent saves time, money and energy for both, Leaves no room for unnecessary quarrel.

By |April 12th, 2017|Advocates for divorce in pune|0 Comments

Lawyers for Divorce in Pune

Ved legal is Associated with experienced Advocates in Divorce /Matrimonial Cases in and around Pune, and have vast experience in the handling  Family issues which arises after marriage, Ved legal gives the proper consultation with the concrete solution to their clients, so that they can settle their dispute amicably. Below is the brief description of the jurisdiction and procedure followed in Family Court.

Introduction

Marriage is an institution which is considered as sacred in India. But with the changing times marriage has become a subject of great judicial scrutiny. Before 1984 all family matters were seen by ordinary civil court judges who used to deal with matters like recovery of money or property. In 1984 the Government of India after the recommendation of the Law Commission in their 59th Report the family courts were created by a Gazette notification of the Central Government. This Act was known as ‘The Family Courts Act, 1984’.

The family courts exercise the entire jurisdiction which is exercised by any District Court or any subordinate civil court in the following matters-

  • Matrimonial causes
  • Maintenance and alimony of spouses
  • Custody and guardianship of children
  • Settlement of spousal property

Ved Legal is a team of Lawyers and Consultants practicing in Divorce, Domestic Violence /Matrimonial cases in Pune, and help to settle the family issues by conciliation.

Cruelty is one of the ground  were either Wife or Husband can claim for Divorce.

Matrimonial matters are matters of delicate human and emotional relationship. It demands mutual trust, regard, respect, love and affection with sufficient play for reasonable adjustments with the spouse. The relationship has to conform to the social norms as well. The matrimonial conduct has now come to be governed by statute framed, keeping in view such norms and changed social order.
Divorce in general means the breakage or dissolution of marriage with the help of law, so that one can leave his or her spouse and become free from marital duties with some exceptions.

What Is Cruelty?

Every matrimonial conduct, which may cause annoyance to the other, may not amount to cruelty. Mere trivial irritations, quarrels between spouses, which happen in day-to-day married life, may also not amount to cruelty. Cruelty in matrimonial life may be of unfounded variety, which can be subtle or brutal. It may be words, gestures or by mere silence, violent or non-violent.

To constitute cruelty, the conduct complained of should be “grave and weighty” so as to come to the conclusion that the spouse cannot be reasonably expected to live with the other spouse. It must be something more serious than “ordinary wear and tear of married life”. The conduct taking into consideration the circumstances and background has to be examined to reach the conclusion whether the conduct complained of amounts to cruelty in the matrimonial law.

Conduct has to be considered, as noted above, in the background of several factors such as social status of parties, their education, physical and mental conditions, customs and traditions. It is difficult to lay down a precise definition or to give exhaustive description of the circumstances, which would constitute cruelty. It must be of the type as to satisfy the conscience of the Court that the relationship between the parties had gone to such extent due to the conduct of the other spouse that it would be impossible for them to live together without mental torture or distress, to entitle the complaining spouse to secure divorce.

Physical violence is not absolutely essential to constitute cruelty and a consistent course of conduct inflicting immeasurable mental agony and torture may well constitute cruelty. Mental cruelty may consist of verbal abuses and insults by using filthy and abusive language leading to constant disturbance of mental peace of the other party.

 

Impact of Physical and Mental Cruelty in Matrimonial Matters;

Prior to the 1976 amendment in the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955 cruelty was not a ground for claiming divorce under the Hindu Marriage Act. It was only a ground for claiming judicial separation under Section 10 of the Act. By 1976 Amendment, the Cruelty was made ground for divorce. The words, which have been incorporated, are “as to cause a reasonable apprehension in the mind of the petitioner that it will be harmful or injurious for the petitioner to live with the other party”.

Legal Provisions:

The Hindu Marriage Act-1955 has given the legal provision for divorce on basis of cruelty under section – 13(1)(ia) as follows;

“Any marriage solemnized, whether before or after the commencement of this Act, may, on a petition presented by either the husband or the wife, be dissolved by a decree of divorce on the ground that the other party has, after the solemnization of the marriage, treated the petitioner with cruelty”.

On basis of this section we can explain this legal basis for the divorce as anybody who is getting suffered from the other party in physical manner or a mental torture or any other type of harassment then the other can reach to the court with this base and claim for the divorce. And there are various cases where courts held that the intention to be cruel is not an essential element of cruelty as envisaged under this section.

 

Any Female/Male who is victim of any physical, sexual or mental torture or any other type of harassment may go to the court and claim for appropriate relief or Divorce under section 13(1)(ia)  of  Hindu Marriage Act  or  may seek protection under the Domestic Violence Act, 2005 which protects Women to live fearless from Men surrounded by them.

Protection given to Women under Domestic Violence Act, 2005 are as follows:

  • The Act seeks to cover those women who are or have been in a relationship with the abuser where both parties have lived together in a shared household and are related by consanguinity, marriage or a relationship in the nature of marriage, or adoption; in addition relationship with family members living together as a joint family are also included. Even those women who are sisters, widows, mothers, single women, or living with them are entitled to get legal protection under the proposed Act.
  • “Domestic violence” includes actual abuse or the threat of abuse that is physical, sexual, verbal, emotional and economic. Harassment by way of unlawful dowry demands to the woman or her relatives would also be covered under this definition.
  • One of the most important features of the Act is the woman’s right to secure housing. The Act provides for the woman’s right to reside in the matrimonial or shared household, whether or not she has any title or rights in the household. This right is secured by a residence order, which is passed by a court. These residence orders cannot be passed against anyone who is a woman.
  • The other relief envisaged under the Act is that of the power of the court to pass protection orders that prevent the abuser from aiding or committing an act of domestic violence or any other specified act, entering a workplace or any other place frequented by the abused, attempting to communicate with the abused, isolating any assets used by both the parties and causing violence to the abused, her relatives and others who provide her assistance from the domestic violence.
  • The draft Act provides for appointment of Protection Officers  provide assistance to the woman w.r.t medical examination, legal aid, safe shelter, etc.
  • The Act provides for breach of protection order or interim protection order by the respondent as a cognizable and non-bailable offence punishable with imprisonment for a term which may extend to one year or with fine which may extend to twenty thousand rupees or with both. Similarly, non-compliance or discharge of duties by the Protection Officer is also sought to be made an offence under the Act with similar punishment.

“economic abuse” includes deprivation of all or any economic or financial resources to which the victim is entitled under any law or custom whether payable under an order of a Court or otherwise or which the victim requires out of necessity including, but not limited to, household necessities for the aggrieved person and her children, if any, stridhan, property, jointly or separately owned by her, payment of rental related to the shared household and maintenance and disposal of household effects, any alienation of assets whether movable or immovable, valuables, shares, securities, bonds and the like or other property in which the victim has an interest or is entitled to use by virtue of the domestic relationship or which may be reasonably required by the victim or her children or her stridhan or any other property jointly or separately held by the victim and prohibition or restriction to continued access to resources or facilities which the victim is entitled to use or enjoy by virtue of the domestic relationship including access to the shared household,

“physical abuse” means any act or conduct which is of such a nature as to cause bodily pain, harm or danger to life, limb, or health or impair the health or development of the victim and includes assault, criminal intimidation and criminal force.

 

Advocates for Divorce in pune

Ved Legal comprises of a dedicated team of experts. We offer a multitude of services in the areas of Co-operative and Property law, but we are best known for our expertise in the Co-operative field i.e. Society Formation/Registration as well as Deemed Conveyance, Conveyance thereof. We have vast experience in representing our clients in matters of Society Formation, Deemed Conveyance, and Recovery. We also undertake different types of property matters including Conveyances, Agreements (Rent, Lease and Leave & Licenses), Partnership Firms & Its Registration, Wills, Probates, Succession, Contracts etc..First of all, we should tell you that as you are good friend of one of the spouse you can go a extra mile to make things better and try to reconcile them. Divorce must be the last option when all the options of reconciliation have been exhausted.

Assuming your friends are both Hindus they can apply a divorce under Mutual Divorce and it is recognized under Section 13B of the Hindu Marriage Act.Section 13B states that the parties can jointly move a petition for dissolution of marriage by a decree of divorce in the District Court on the ground that they have been living separately for a period of one year or more, that they have not been able to live together and that they have mutually agreed that the marriage should be dissolved.
The Court shall then record the joint statement of the Parties and pass a First Motion Order giving time of 6 month to the parties to resolve their dispute, however in case the parties are unable to resolve the issues within the stipulated time, the Court shall pass a decree of Divorce. So therefore, divorce by mutual consent takes about 6-7 months.
The general rule is the divorce by mutual consent is filled by both parties jointly and their joint statement is recorded in the court which is signed by both in presence of their lawyers and the Family District Judge. This process is repeated twice once when the joint petition id filled also called first motion and after six months, which is referred as second motion.
After this process is complete, Judge is satisfied of the consent of both for divorce all issues like custody of child if any, permanent alimony and maintenance, issue relating to return of stridhan of the wife and settlement of jointly owned properties, divorce is granted.
You should enter into a Settlement Agreement with your wife with respect to the terms and conditions of the divorce. This should specify the distribution of assets such as stridhan etc., maintenance/alimony payable by you post divorce that this amount would be a full and final payment and no party shall have any other rights as against the other party. And get this Agreement signed by 2 witnesses.
In any of the spouse is not ready for the mutual divorce, then anyone can file a petition under any of the grounds mentioned under Section 13(1) of the Hindu Marriage Act. The following are the grounds for divorce in India mentioned under the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955.

1. Adultery – The act of indulging in any kind of sexual relationship including intercourse outside marriage is termed as adultery. Adultery is counted as a criminal offence and substantial proofs are required to establish it. An amendment to the law in 1976 states that one single act of adultery is enough for the petitioner to get a divorce.

2. Cruelty – A spouse can file a divorce case when he/she is subjected to any kind of mental and physical injury that causes danger to life, limb and health. The intangible acts of cruelty through mental torture are not judged upon one single act but series of incidents. Certain instances like the food being denied, continuous ill treatment and abuses to acquire dowry, perverse sexual act etc are included under cruelty.

3. Desertion – If one of the spouses voluntarily abandons his/her partner for at least a period of two years, the abandoned spouse can file a divorce case on the ground of desertion.

4. Conversion – In case, either of the two converts himself/herself into another religion, the other spouse may file a divorce case based on this ground.

5. Mental Disorder – Mental disorder can become a ground for filing a divorce if the spouse of the petitioner suffers from incurable mental disorder and insanity and therefore cannot be expected from the couple to stay together.

6. Leprosy – In case of a ‘virulent and incurable’ form of leprosy, a petition can be filed by the other spouse based on this ground.

7. Venereal Disease – If one of the spouses is suffering from a serious disease that is easily communicable, a divorce can be filed by the other spouse. The sexually transmitted diseases like AIDS are accounted to be venereal diseases.

8. Renunciation – A spouse is entitled to file for a divorce if the other renounces all worldly affairs by embracing a religious order.

9. Not Heard Alive – If a person is not seen or heard alive by those who are expected to be ‘naturally heard’ of the person for a continuous period of seven years, the person is presumed to be dead. The other spouse should need to file a divorce if he/she is interested in remarriage.

10. No Resumption of Co-habitation – It becomes a ground for divorce if the couple fails to resume their co-habitation after the court has passed a decree of separation.

The following are the grounds for divorce in India on which a petition can be filed only by the wife.

1. If the husband has indulged in rape, bestiality and sodomy.

2. If the marriage is solemnized before the Hindu Marriage Act and the husband has again married another woman in spite of the first wife being alive, the first wife can seek for a divorce.

3. A girl is entitled to file for a divorce if she was married before the age of fifteen and renounces the marriage before she attains eighteen years of age.

4. If there is no co-habitation for one year and the husband neglects the judgment of maintenance awarded to the wife by the court, the wife can contest for a divorce.

Advocates for Mutual consent Divorce in Pune

Advocates for Divorce in Pune:-

Ved legal is an expertise team working on issues related to family matters through their Associated Lawyers and Consultants, in the first instance we try to resolve the issues through reconciliation or settlement between the parties. We try to save the relation as it is not just two person who gets separated but two families their children if any.

Divorce Law under section 13B:-

Effect of divorce a petition for divorce is not like any other commercial suit. A divorce not only affects the parties, their children, if any, and their families but the society also feels its reverberations. Stress should always be on preserving the institution of marriage. That is the requirement of law. The Family Courts should endeavour, in the first instance to effect reconciliation or settlement between the parties. Even where the family courts are not functioning, the objects and principles underlying the constitution of these courts can be kept in view by the Civil Court trying matrimonial causes.

Advocates for Divorce by Mutual Consent:-

It is an easiest way to dissolve the marriage, Divorce by Mutual Consent is subject to the provisions of this Act a petition for dissolution of marriage by a decree of divorce may be presented to the district court by both the parties to a marriage together, whether such marriage was solemnized before or after the commencement of the Marriage Laws (Amendment)Act,1976, on the ground that they have been living separately for a period of one year or more, that they have not been able to live together and that they have mutually agreed that the marriage should be dissolved.
A petition under S 13-B is not entertainable by the Appellate Court; it has to be filed in the original Court. A decree of divorce by mutual consent can be granted when and only when the Court is satisfied about (i) marriage having been solemnized between the parties; (ii) the parties have been living separately for more than a year before presenting the petition; (iii) they were not able to live together at the time of presenting the petition and continue to live apart; (iv) they had mutually agreed to dissolve the marriage before or at the time the petition was presented; and (v) the contents made in the petition are true and conditions under S.23 are fulfilled. The decree has to be passed only on mutual consent of both the parties the court cannot pass decree on initial consent to be passed.

Advocates for Divorce in Pune

Ved legal is Associated with expertise Lawyers in Divorce and Matrimonial Cases in and around Pune, and have vast experience in the Family related issues which arises after marriage, Ved legal gives the proper consultation with the concrete solution to their clients, so that they can settle their dispute amicably. Below is the brief description of Divorce Law

Matrimonial and Divorce Law

Divorce laws vary from religion to religion in a country with a rich cultural diversity like India. Hindus(which includes Sikh, Jain, Budh) are governed by Hindu Marriage Act,1955. Christians are governed by Indian Divorce Act-1869 & The Indian Christian Marriage Act,1872. Muslims are governed by Personnel laws of Divorce and also the Dissolution of Marriage Act,1939 & The Muslim Women(Protection of Rights on Divorce) Act,1986. Similarly, Parsis are governed by The Parsi Marriage & Divorce Act-1936. And there is also a secular law called Special Marriage Act,1954. A cursory reading of the entire gamut of Indian Laws regarding Divorce makes it clear broadly that the Divorce can be obtained by two ways:

1. Divorce by Mutual Consent

Mutual Consent Divorce is a simple way of coming out of the marriage and dissolves it legally. An important requirement is the mutual consent of the husband & wife. There are two aspects on which Husband & Wife are required to reach a consensus. One is the alimony or maintenance issues. As per Law, there is no minimum or maximum limit of maintenance. It could be any figure or no figure. Next important consideration is the Child Custody. This can also be worked out effectively between the parties. Child Custody in Mutual Consent Divorce can be shared or joint or exclusive depending upon the understanding of the spouses. Duration of Divorce in Mutual Consent varies from one month to six months or more from States to States and as per the High Court directions.

2. Contested Divorce
As the name suggests, you will have to contest it. Indian laws, in general, recognizes cruelty (Physical & Mental), Desertion (Period varies from 2 to 3 years), Unsoundness of mind( of Incurable form), Impotency, renouncing the world, etc. The aggrieved party has to take one of the above grounds for divorce and will have to file the case in the Court of appropriate jurisdiction. Party which files the case has to prove the case with the support of evidence and documents. On successfully proving the case, divorce will be granted and divorce decree will be drawn up accordingly.

ANNULMENT OF MARRIAGE:

Marriage in India can also be dissolved by means of Annulment. Procedure for annulment is same as that of Divorce except that the grounds for annulment are different than that of divorce. Grounds for annulment are fraud, pregnancy of wife by a person other than the husband, impotency prior to the marriage and subsist even at the time of filing the case. Once an annulment is granted by the Indian Court, the status of the parties remains as it was prior to the marriage.

VOID MARRIAGE:
There are certain forms of marriages which are null and void despite the performance /solemnization of the same. Marriage is void under following circumstances:-
a) neither party has a spouse living at the time of the marriage
b) the parties are not within the degrees of prohibited relationship, unless the custom or usage governing each of them permits of a marriage between the two;
c) the parties are not sapindas of each other unless the custom or usage governing each of them permits of a marriage between the two.

The time duration for obtaining divorce varies from case to case & place to place. Generally speaking, contested divorce proceedings take approximately 18 to 24 months. Mutual Consent Divorce varies from 4 weeks to 7 months and more. In Delhi, Mutual Consent Divorce is possible within two to four weeks. Generally speaking procedure for obtaining Divorce in all forms of law (based on religion) is same with only a mild variation.

For More information please contact us:
Consultants for Housing Co-operative Society in Pune
Ved Legal
Email: [email protected] / [email protected]
Mobile: +91 9763040088

Advocates for Matrimonial and Divorce Law

Ved legal is Associated with expertise Lawyers in Divorce and Matrimonial Cases in and around Pune, and have vast experience in the Family related issues which arises after marriage, Ved legal gives the proper consultation with the concrete solution to their clients, so that they can settle their dispute amicably. Below is the brief description of Divorce Laws

Advocates for Matrimonial and Divorce Law

Divorce laws vary from religion to religion in a country with a rich cultural diversity like India. Hindus(which includes Sikh, Jain, Budh) are governed by Hindu Marriage Act,1955. Christians are governed by Indian Divorce Act-1869 & The Indian Christian Marriage Act,1872. Muslims are governed by Personnel laws of Divorce and also the Dissolution of Marriage Act,1939 & The Muslim Women(Protection of Rights on Divorce) Act,1986. Similarly, Parsis are governed by The Parsi Marriage & Divorce Act-1936. And there is also a secular law called Special Marriage Act,1954. A cursory reading of the entire gamut of Indian Laws regarding Divorce makes it clear broadly that the Divorce can be obtained by two ways:

1. Divorce by Mutual Consent

Mutual Consent Divorce is a simple way of coming out of the marriage and dissolves it legally. An important requirement is the mutual consent of the husband & wife. There are two aspects on which Husband & Wife are required to reach a consensus. One is the alimony or maintenance issues. As per Law, there is no minimum or maximum limit of maintenance. It could be any figure or no figure. Next important consideration is the Child Custody. This can also be worked out effectively between the parties. Child Custody in Mutual Consent Divorce can be shared or joint or exclusive depending upon the understanding of the spouses. Duration of Divorce in Mutual Consent varies from one month to six months or more from States to States and as per the High Court directions.

2. Contested Divorce
As the name suggests, you will have to contest it. Indian laws, in general, recognizes cruelty (Physical & Mental), Desertion (Period varies from 2 to 3 years), Unsoundness of mind( of Incurable form), Impotency, renouncing the world, etc. The aggrieved party has to take one of the above grounds for divorce and will have to file the case in the Court of appropriate jurisdiction. Party which files the case has to prove the case with the support of evidence and documents. On successfully proving the case, divorce will be granted and divorce decree will be drawn up accordingly.

ANNULMENT OF MARRIAGE:

Marriage in India can also be dissolved by means of Annulment. Procedure for annulment is same as that of Divorce except that the grounds for annulment are different than that of divorce. Grounds for annulment are fraud, pregnancy of wife by a person other than the husband, impotency prior to the marriage and subsist even at the time of filing the case. Once an annulment is granted by the Indian Court, the status of the parties remains as it was prior to the marriage.

VOID MARRIAGE:
There are certain forms of marriages which are null and void despite the performance /solemnization of the same. Marriage is void under following circumstances:-
a) neither party has a spouse living at the time of the marriage
b) the parties are not within the degrees of prohibited relationship, unless the custom or usage governing each of them permits of a marriage between the two;
c) the parties are not sapindas of each other unless the custom or usage governing each of them permits of a marriage between the two.

The time duration for obtaining divorce varies from case to case & place to place. Generally speaking, contested divorce proceedings take approximately 18 to 24 months. Mutual Consent Divorce varies from 4 weeks to 7 months and more. In Delhi, Mutual Consent Divorce is possible within two to four weeks. Generally speaking procedure for obtaining Divorce in all forms of law (based on religion) is same with only a mild variation.

For More information please contact us:
Consultants for Housing Co-operative Society in Pune
Ved Legal
Email: [email protected] / [email protected]
Mobile: +91 9763040088

Advocates for Adoptions & Maintenance of wife

Ved legal is Associated with expertise Lawyers in Divorce and Matrimonial Cases in and around Pune, and have vast experience in the Family related issues which arises after marriage, Ved legal gives the proper consultation with the concrete solution to their clients, so that they can settle their dispute amicably. Below is the brief description of the Maintenance of Wife under Hindu Adoptions & Maintenance Act, 1956
Maintenance of Wife under Hindu Adoptions & Maintenance Act, 1956:-
Maintenance, is the support to live life having provision for food, clothing, residence, education, medical attendance and treatment and shelter which, when denies, are required immediately to be granted and cannot await the duration of a long trial. It is relevant to notice, in that behalf, that the provisions of section 18 (1) give absolute entitlement to Hindu wife to be maintained by her husband during her life time.
1) As per the provision of Section 18 of Hindu Adoptions & Maintenance Act, 1956. Hindu wife, whether she is married before or after the commencement of this Act, shall be entitled to be maintained by her husband during her life time.
2) A Hindu wife shall be entitled to live separately from her husband with waiving her claim to maintenance.
a) if the husband is guilty of desertion, that is to say, of abandoning her without reasonable cause and without her Consent, or against her wish , or willfully neglecting her;
b) If the husband has treated her with such cruelty as to cause a reasonable apprehension in her mind that it will be harmful or injurious to live with her husband;
c) if the husband is suffering from a virulent disease that is form of leprosy.
d) if the husband has any other wife living;
e) if the husband keeps a concubine (not wife ) in the house in which his wife is living or habitually resides with a concubine elsewhere;
f) if the husband has changed his religion from Hindu to another religion, by conversion.
g) if there is any other cause justifying living separately.
3) A Hindu wife shall not be entitled to separate residence and maintenance from her husband if wife is Hindu and has change her religion from Hindu to another religion.

Divorce lawyers in pune

Ved legal is Associated with expertise Advocates in Divorce and Matrimonial Cases in and around Pune, and have vast experience in the Family issues which arises after marriage, Ved legal gives the proper consultation with the concrete solution to their clients, so that they can settle their dispute amicably. Below is the brief description of the jurisdiction and procedure followed in Family Court.
Introduction
Marriage is an institution which is considered as sacred in India. But with the changing times marriage has become a subject of great judicial scrutiny. Before 1984 all family matters were seen by ordinary civil court judges who used to deal with matters like recovery of money or property. In 1984 the Government of India after the recommendation of the Law Commission in their 59th Report the family courts were created by a Gazette notification of the Central Government. This Act was known as ‘The Family Courts Act, 1984’.
Jurisdiction
1. Civil matters
The family courts exercise the entire jurisdiction which is exercised by any District Court or any subordinate civil court in the following matters-
• Matrimonial causes
• Maintenance and alimony of spouses
• Custody and guardianship of children
• Settlement of spousal property
2. Criminal matters
The judge is vested with the power exercisable by the Magistrate of First Class under Chapter IX of Code of Criminal Procedure section 125 which is Order for maintenance of wives, children and parents.
Powers of Family Court
1. The family court has the power to make their own procedure.
2. They are not required to record the oral statement of the witness at length.
3. The appeal from family courts lies directly to the High Court.
4. The Family Court can receive any document or statement even if it is not admissible under Indian Evidence Act 1872.

Procedure to be followed by family court
1. Section 9 provides that the family court should try to resolve the matter through conciliation and settlement.
2. If there is possibility of settlement of dispute the court should adjourn the proceedings until such settlement is arrived at.
3. The parties of the proceeding are not required to hire a legal practitioner; however they are entitled to appoint an ‘amicus curie’ to assist the parties in the settlement proceedings.
4. In camera proceedings can be ordered if the parties desire. (In camera proceedings means that the public is not allowed to see the proceedings)
5. Judgment should be concise with the statement of the case, determination of the decision and the reason for the decision.
6. Provisions of Code of Civil Procedure, 1908 are applied in the enforcement of the order or the judgment.
7. The Court can take assistance of medical and welfare experts.
Appeal
1. Appeal from judgment or order of Family Court can be made to the High Court within 30 days of passing the order or the judgment.
2. The appeal can be on both question of law and question of fact.
3. The appeal should be heard by a High Court bench of two or more judges.
4. No appeal lies against an order which is passed with the consent of the parties.
Steps to follow for registering a suit in a Family Court
1. If a person wants to register a suit in the family court then he needs to describe all the details clearly on a watermarked paper and submitted along with the court fees.
2. Along with the suit papers the petitioner should attach an affidavit that all the facts stated in the plaint is true.
3. The papers are submitted to the registrar of the Family Court who verifies all the relevant documents.
4. These files are presented to the Principal Judge of the Family Court. After verification of each file and hearing the petitioners, the Principal Judge decides whether the suit is fit for registration.
5. The applicant files the summons form and gets the next date for hearing.