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Advocate For Divorce In Pune

*DIVORCE BY MUTUAL CONSENT

Mutual Consent Divorce was brought by the India Parliament vide Amendment in the year 1976 in the Hindu Marriage Act.

Divorce by Mutual Consent means when both Husband and wife has agreed amicably amongst themselves that they cannot live together anymore and that the best solution is to Divorce, without putting forth any allegations against each other, in the court of law, than such a Divorce petition presented jointly before the honorably court, is known as mutual consent Divorce.

It is the quickest form of divorce in India. The Conditions required under Section 13B of the Hindu Marriage Act are as follows:

(i)           Husband and wife have been living separately for a period of one year or more,

(ii)          That they are unable to live together,

(iii)         And that both husband and wife have mutually agreed that the marriage has totally         collapsed, hence marriage should be dissolved.

As per law, duration/time of obtaining mutual consent divorce is six months. Although, parties have option of filing the second motion petition any time between six months and eighteen months from the date of the filing of the Mutual Consent Divorce Petition.

PETITION FOR MUTUAL CONSENT DIVORCE CAN BE FILED AT ANY OF THE FOLLOWING PLACE:-

  • Place where marriage had taken place
  • Place where husband and wife last resided together.
  • Place where wife is residing at the time of filing of the Petition

Once petition for divorce by mutual consent is filed, party’s presences are required in the Court for recording of the statement. In the event one of the party is unable to come, such party can appear through power of attorney. Such power of attorney preferably should be a family member of the spouse. Once statement is recorded, it is commonly called First Motion has been granted.

After passing of first motion, parties are called upon to wait for six months period before moving Petition for second motion. This period is extendible unto eighteen months. This six months period in mutual consent divorce is generally called cooling-off period. Six months period are given to parties to think their relationship again. It is given for reconciliation.

After six months period, if parties have been unable to resolve their differences, they will have to appear in the Court again. Statement of parties would be recorded again.

During the period of six months i.e. before moving second motion, both parties have liberty to withdraw their consent for divorce.

After this Court passes an order dissolving the marriage by granting decree of divorce and thereby marriage stands dissolved.

ADVANTAGES OF MUTUAL DIVORCE

Divorce by Mutual consent saves time, money and energy for both, Leaves no room for unnecessary quarrel.

Divorce, also known as dissolution of marriage, is the termination of a marriage or marital union, the canceling or reorganizing of the legal duties and responsibilities of marriage, thus dissolving the bonds of matrimony between married couples under the rule of law.

Divorce requires the sanction of a court or other authority in a legal process, which may involve issues of alimony (spousal support), child custody, child visitation/ access, parenting time, child support, distribution of property, and division of debt.

Divorce should not be confused with annulment, which declares the marriage null and void; with legal separation or de jure separation (a legal process by which a married couple may formalize a de facto separation  while remaining legally married) or with de facto separation (a process where the spouses informally stop cohabiting).

Reasons for divorce vary, from sexual incompatibility or lack of independence for one or both spouses to a personality clash.

The Hindu Marriage Act is an Act of the Parliament of India enacted in 1955.

Three other important acts were also enacted as part of the Hindu Code Bills during this time:

  • the Hindu Succession Act (1956),
  • the Hindu Minority and Guardianship Act (1956),
  • the Hindu Adoptions and Maintenance Act (1956).

Due to the existence of diverse religious faiths in India, the Indian Judiciary has implemented laws separately for couples belonging to different religious beliefs. Mutual consent divorce procedure is relatively easier and fast while contested divorce procedure takes longer and depends on the religions of the couples.

DIVORCE UNDER VARIOUS ACTS IN INDIA:

  • The Hindu Marriage Act, 1955
  • The Parsi Marriage and Divorce Act, 1936
  • The Special Marriage Act, 1956
  • The Foreign Marriage Act, 1969
  • Dissolution of Muslim Marriages Act, 1939
  • The Dissolution of Marriage (under the Indian Divorce Act, 1869)
  • Judicial separation (under the Indian Divorce Act, 1869)

For More Details Call:

VED LEGAL,

Adv. Gajanan Rahate

Mob: 9763040088

E_mail: [email protected]

By |April 13th, 2018|Advocate For Divorce In Pune|0 Comments

Advocate For Divorce In Pune

Divorce under Hindu Marriage Act

Under the old Hindu laws, divorce was viewed as forbidden and was not talked about as freely as it is spoken out today, but with the codification of the laws the provision of divorce were laid down The provision of “Divorce” has been dealt with under the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955 as being a true blue method whereby both the parties to the marriage, decide to break all the promises or vows taken at the time of marriage. All Hindus, Buddhist, Jains or Sikhs are covered under the divorce provisions of the act.

Grounds for Divorce
The following grounds can be invoked for securing a divorce under the act:

Adultery: During the period of marriage, if either spouse maintains sexual relations with a person other than his or her lawfully wedded companion.
1. Cruelty: After the marriage, subjecting the petitioner to cruelty.
2. Desertion: If either one of the parties to the marriage deserts the other for a consistent span of at least two years , prior to the filing of the petition by the other party.
3. Conversion to another religion by either party other than Hinduism
4. Mental Disorder: If the spouse of the petitioner suffers from any unsoundness of mind, mental illness or disorder that cannot be cured, then the petitioner can file for divorce
5. Virulent and Incurable Disease: in the form of leprosy.
6. Venerable Disease in Communicable form.
7. The renunciation of the world or entered any religious order.
8. Not heard being alive for a period of seven years or more.
Additional Grounds for Dissolution of the Marriage by the Wife
Under the act, the wife is entitled to seek divorce from her husband on the following grounds:
1. Where the husband has another living wife from his previous subsisting marriage, before the commencement of the act.
2. Post the marriage, the husband was found guilty of rape, sodomy or bestiality.
3. Where the wife was awarded an order or decree for maintenance under section 18 of the Hindu Adoption and Maintenance Act, 1956 or under section 125 of the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1975, by the court, in spite of the fact that she was living apart from her husband even before the passage of such decree or order. The conjugal relations between the parties failed to resume within one year or more, even after the passage of this order.
4. The marriage was performed before the attainment of 15 years of age by the wife, and on completion of 15 years and not before 18 years of age, the wife rejected the marriage Under the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955, a divorce petition can be filed by the parties only after the passage of one year from the marriage date.

The Irretrievable breakdown of Marriage
The Marriage Laws (Amendment) Bill, 2010 incorporated another ground for seeking divorce, namely the ‘Irretrievable breakdown of marriage’ under the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955 and the Special Marriage Act, 1954. As the term suggests, it leads to a situation whereby, either or both the parties to the marriage fine it impossible to peacefully cohabit with each other, due to personality’s clashes, differences in opinion and have lived separately from each other for a long period of time and are no longer too eager to further carry on their matrimonial relationship.

Section 13B in the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955
*13B DIVORCE BY MUTUAL CONSENT —

(1) Subject to the provisions of this Act a petition for dissolution of marriage by a decree of divorce may be presented to the district court by both the parties to a marriage together, whether such marriage was solemnized before or after the commencement of the Marriage Laws (Amendment) Act, 1976 (68 of 1976)*, on the ground that they have been living separately for a period of one year or more, that they have not been able to live together and that they have mutually agreed that the marriage should be dissolved.

(2) On the motion of both the parties made not earlier than six months after the date of the presentation of the petition referred to in sub-section (1) and not later than eighteen months after the said date, if the petition is not withdrawn in the meantime, the court shall, on being satisfied, after hearing the parties and after making such inquiry as it thinks fit, that a marriage has been solemnized and that the averments in the petition are true, pass a decree of divorce declaring the marriage to be dissolved with effect from the date of the decree.]

(i) The period of 6 to 18 months provided in section 13B is a period of interregnum which is intended to give time and opportunity to the parties to reflect on their move. In this transitional period the parties or either of them may have second thoughts; Suman v. Surendra Kumar, AIR 2003 Raj 155.

(ii) The period of living separately for one year must be immediately preceding the presentation of petition. The expression ‘living separately’ connotes not living like husband and wife. It has no reference to the place of living. The parties may live under the same roof and yet they may not be living as husband and wife. The parties should have no desire to perform marital obligations; Sureshta Devi v. Om Prakash, AIR 1992 SC 1904.

(iii) The period of six to eighteen months time is given in divorce by mutual consent as to give time and opportunity to the parties to reflect on their move and seek advice from relations and friends. Mutual consent should continue till the divorce decree is passed. The court should be satisfied about the bona fides and consent of the parties. If there is no consent at the time of enquiry the court gets no jurisdiction to make a decree for divorce. If the court is held to have the power to make a decree solely based on the initial petition, it negates the whole idea of mutuality. There can be unilateral withdrawal of consent. Held, that since consent of the wife was obtained by fraud and wife was not willing to consent, there could be unilateral withdrawal, of consent; Sureshta Devi v. Om Prakash, AIR 1992 SC 1904.

*PROCEDURE FOR MUTUAL CONSENT DIVORCE
Mutual Consent Divorce was brought by the India Parliament vide Amendment in the year 1976 in the Hindu Marriage Act.
As per law, duration/time of obtaining mutual consent divorce is six months. Although, parties have option of filing the second motion petition any time between six months and eighteen months from the date of the filing of the Mutual Consent Divorce Petition.
As a mutual consent divorce lawyers, we “VED LEGAL” provide platform to parties to discuss these issues in calm atmosphere and reach to their own solutions. We provide different options using our vast experience in the field to resolve issues affecting the chances of settlement.

Petition for mutual consent divorce can be filed at any of the following place:-
• Place where marriage had taken place
• Place where husband and wife last resided together.
• Place where wife is residing at the time of filing of the Petition

Once petition for divorce by mutual consent is filed, parties presence are required in the Court for recording of the statement. In the event one of the party is unable to come, such party can appear through power of attorney. Such power of attorney preferably should be a family member of the spouse. Once statement is recorded, it is commonly called First Motion has been granted.
After passing of first motion, parties are called upon to wait for six months period before moving Petition for second motion. This period is extendible unto eighteen months. This six months period in mutual consent divorce is generally called cooling-off period. Six months period are given to parties to think over their relationship again. It is given for reconciliation.
After six months period, if parties have been unable to resolve their differences, they will have to appear in the Court again. Statement of parties would be recorded again.

During the period of six months i.e. before moving second motion, both parties have liberty to withdraw their consent for divorce.
After this Court passes an order dissolving the marriage by granting decree of divorce and thereby marriage stands dissolved.

*DIVORCE LAWS

vary from religion to religion in a country with a rich cultural diversity like India. Hindus(which includes Sikh, Jain, Budh) are governed by Hindu Marriage Act,1955. Christians are governed by Indian Divorce Act-1869 & The Indian Christian Marriage Act,1872. Muslims are governed by Personnel laws of Divorce and also the Dissolution of Marriage Act,1939 & The Muslim Women(Protection of Rights on Divorce) Act,1986. Similarly, Parsis are governed by The Parsi Marriage & Divorce Act-1936. And there is also a secular law called Special Marriage Act,1954. A cursory reading of the entire gamut of Indian Laws regarding Divorce makes it clear broadly that the Divorce can be obtained by two ways:

1. Divorce by Mutual Consent

Mutual Consent Divorce is a simple way of coming out of the marriage and dissolves it legally. An important requirement is the mutual consent of the husband & wife. There are two aspects on which Husband & Wife are required to reach a consensus. One is the alimony or maintenance issues. As per Law, there is no minimum or maximum limit of maintenance. It could be any figure or no figure. Next important consideration is the Child Custody. This can also be worked out effectively between the parties. Child Custody in Mutual Consent Divorce can be shared or joint or exclusive depending upon the understanding of the spouses. Duration of Divorce in Mutual Consent varies from one month to six months or more from States to States and as per the High Court directions.

2. Contested Divorce

As the name suggests, you will have to contest it. Indian laws, in general, recognizes cruelty (Physical & Mental), Desertion (Period varies from 2 to 3 years), Unsoundness of mind( of Incurable form), Impotency, renouncing the world, etc. The aggrieved party has to take one of the above grounds for divorce and will have to file the case in the Court of appropriate jurisdiction. Party which files the case has to prove the case with the support of evidence and documents. On successfully proving the case, divorce will be granted and divorce decree will be drawn up accordingly.

ANNULMENT OF MARRIAGE:

Marriage in India can also be dissolved by means of Annulment. Procedure for annulment is same as that of Divorce except that the grounds for annulment are different than that of divorce. Grounds for annulment are fraud, pregnancy of wife by a person other than the husband, impotency prior to the marriage and subsist even at the time of filing the case. Once an annulment is granted by the Indian Court, the status of the parties remains as it was prior to the marriage.

VOID MARRIAGE:

There are certain forms of marriages which are null and void despite the performance /solemnization of the same. Marriage is void under following circumstances:-

a) neither party has a spouse living at the time of the marriage

b) the parties are not within the degrees of prohibited relationship, unless the custom or usage governing each of them permits of a marriage between the two;

c) the parties are not sapindas of each other unless the custom or usage governing each of them permits of a marriage between the two.

The time duration for obtaining divorce varies from case to case & place to place. Generally speaking, contested divorce proceedings take approximately 18 to 24 months. Mutual Consent Divorce varies from 4 weeks to 7 months and more. In Delhi, Mutual Consent Divorce is possible within two to four weeks. Generally speaking procedure for obtaining Divorce in all forms of law (based on religion) is same with only a mild variation.
For More information please contact us:

Consultants for Housing Co-operative Society in Pune
Ved Legal
Email: [email protected] / [email protected]
Mobile: +91 9763040088

*DIVORCE BY MUTUAL CONSENT

Mutual Consent Divorce was brought by the India Parliament vide Amendment in the year 1976 in the Hindu Marriage Act.
Divorce by Mutual Consent means when both Husband and wife has agreed amicably amongst themselves that they cannot live together anymore and that the best solution is to Divorce, without putting forth any allegations against each other, in the court of law, than such a Divorce petition presented jointly before the honorably court, is known as mutual consent Divorce.
It is the quickest form of divorce in India. The Conditions required under Section 13B of the Hindu Marriage Act are as follows:
(i) Husband and wife have been living separately for a period of one year or more,
(ii) That they are unable to live together,
(iii) And that both husband and wife have mutually agreed that the marriage has totally collapsed, hence marriage should be dissolved.

As per law, duration/time of obtaining mutual consent divorce is six months. Although, parties have option of filing the second motion petition any time between six months and eighteen months from the date of the filing of the Mutual Consent Divorce Petition.

PETITION FOR MUTUAL CONSENT DIVORCE CAN BE FILED AT ANY OF THE FOLLOWING PLACE:-
• Place where marriage had taken place
• Place where husband and wife last resided together.
• Place where wife is residing at the time of filing of the Petition

Once petition for divorce by mutual consent is filed, party’s presences are required in the Court for recording of the statement. In the event one of the party is unable to come, such party can appear through power of attorney. Such power of attorney preferably should be a family member of the spouse. Once statement is recorded, it is commonly called First Motion has been granted.

After passing of first motion, parties are called upon to wait for six months period before moving Petition for second motion. This period is extendible unto eighteen months. This six months period in mutual consent divorce is generally called cooling-off period. Six months period are given to parties to think their relationship again. It is given for reconciliation.
After six months period, if parties have been unable to resolve their differences, they will have to appear in the Court again. Statement of parties would be recorded again.

During the period of six months i.e. before moving second motion, both parties have liberty to withdraw their consent for divorce.
After this Court passes an order dissolving the marriage by granting decree of divorce and thereby marriage stands dissolved.

ADVANTAGES OF MUTUAL DIVORCE
Divorce by Mutual consent saves time, money and energy for both, Leaves no room for unnecessary quarrel.

By |November 4th, 2017|Advocate For Divorce In Pune|0 Comments

Advocate For Divorce In Pune

Divorce under Hindu Marriage Act

Under the old Hindu laws, divorce was viewed as forbidden and was not talked about as freely as it is spoken out today, but with the codification of the laws the provision of divorce were laid down The provision of “Divorce” has been dealt with under the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955 as being a true blue method whereby both the parties to the marriage, decide to break all the promises or vows taken at the time of marriage. All Hindus, Buddhist, Jains or Sikhs are covered under the divorce provisions of the act.

Grounds for Divorce
The following grounds can be invoked for securing a divorce under the act:

Adultery: During the period of marriage, if either spouse maintains sexual relations with a person other than his or her lawfully wedded companion.
1. Cruelty: After the marriage, subjecting the petitioner to cruelty.
2. Desertion: If either one of the parties to the marriage deserts the other for a consistent span of at least two years , prior to the filing of the petition by the other party.
3. Conversion to another religion by either party other than Hinduism
4. Mental Disorder: If the spouse of the petitioner suffers from any unsoundness of mind, mental illness or disorder that cannot be cured, then the petitioner can file for divorce
5. Virulent and Incurable Disease: in the form of leprosy.
6. Venerable Disease in Communicable form.
7. The renunciation of the world or entered any religious order.
8. Not heard being alive for a period of seven years or more.
Additional Grounds for Dissolution of the Marriage by the Wife
Under the act, the wife is entitled to seek divorce from her husband on the following grounds:
1. Where the husband has another living wife from his previous subsisting marriage, before the commencement of the act.
2. Post the marriage, the husband was found guilty of rape, sodomy or bestiality.
3. Where the wife was awarded an order or decree for maintenance under section 18 of the Hindu Adoption and Maintenance Act, 1956 or under section 125 of the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1975, by the court, in spite of the fact that she was living apart from her husband even before the passage of such decree or order. The conjugal relations between the parties failed to resume within one year or more, even after the passage of this order.
4. The marriage was performed before the attainment of 15 years of age by the wife, and on completion of 15 years and not before 18 years of age, the wife rejected the marriage Under the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955, a divorce petition can be filed by the parties only after the passage of one year from the marriage date.

The Irretrievable breakdown of Marriage
The Marriage Laws (Amendment) Bill, 2010 incorporated another ground for seeking divorce, namely the ‘Irretrievable breakdown of marriage’ under the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955 and the Special Marriage Act, 1954. As the term suggests, it leads to a situation whereby, either or both the parties to the marriage fine it impossible to peacefully cohabit with each other, due to personality’s clashes, differences in opinion and have lived separately from each other for a long period of time and are no longer too eager to further carry on their matrimonial relationship.

Section 13B in the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955
*13B DIVORCE BY MUTUAL CONSENT —

(1) Subject to the provisions of this Act a petition for dissolution of marriage by a decree of divorce may be presented to the district court by both the parties to a marriage together, whether such marriage was solemnized before or after the commencement of the Marriage Laws (Amendment) Act, 1976 (68 of 1976)*, on the ground that they have been living separately for a period of one year or more, that they have not been able to live together and that they have mutually agreed that the marriage should be dissolved.

(2) On the motion of both the parties made not earlier than six months after the date of the presentation of the petition referred to in sub-section (1) and not later than eighteen months after the said date, if the petition is not withdrawn in the meantime, the court shall, on being satisfied, after hearing the parties and after making such inquiry as it thinks fit, that a marriage has been solemnized and that the averments in the petition are true, pass a decree of divorce declaring the marriage to be dissolved with effect from the date of the decree.]

(i) The period of 6 to 18 months provided in section 13B is a period of interregnum which is intended to give time and opportunity to the parties to reflect on their move. In this transitional period the parties or either of them may have second thoughts; Suman v. Surendra Kumar, AIR 2003 Raj 155.

(ii) The period of living separately for one year must be immediately preceding the presentation of petition. The expression ‘living separately’ connotes not living like husband and wife. It has no reference to the place of living. The parties may live under the same roof and yet they may not be living as husband and wife. The parties should have no desire to perform marital obligations; Sureshta Devi v. Om Prakash, AIR 1992 SC 1904.

(iii) The period of six to eighteen months time is given in divorce by mutual consent as to give time and opportunity to the parties to reflect on their move and seek advice from relations and friends. Mutual consent should continue till the divorce decree is passed. The court should be satisfied about the bona fides and consent of the parties. If there is no consent at the time of enquiry the court gets no jurisdiction to make a decree for divorce. If the court is held to have the power to make a decree solely based on the initial petition, it negates the whole idea of mutuality. There can be unilateral withdrawal of consent. Held, that since consent of the wife was obtained by fraud and wife was not willing to consent, there could be unilateral withdrawal, of consent; Sureshta Devi v. Om Prakash, AIR 1992 SC 1904.

*PROCEDURE FOR MUTUAL CONSENT DIVORCE
Mutual Consent Divorce was brought by the India Parliament vide Amendment in the year 1976 in the Hindu Marriage Act.
As per law, duration/time of obtaining mutual consent divorce is six months. Although, parties have option of filing the second motion petition any time between six months and eighteen months from the date of the filing of the Mutual Consent Divorce Petition.
As a mutual consent divorce lawyers, we “VED LEGAL” provide platform to parties to discuss these issues in calm atmosphere and reach to their own solutions. We provide different options using our vast experience in the field to resolve issues affecting the chances of settlement.
Petition for mutual consent divorce can be filed at any of the following place:-
• Place where marriage had taken place
• Place where husband and wife last resided together.
• Place where wife is residing at the time of filing of the Petition

Once petition for divorce by mutual consent is filed, parties presence are required in the Court for recording of the statement. In the event one of the party is unable to come, such party can appear through power of attorney. Such power of attorney preferably should be a family member of the spouse. Once statement is recorded, it is commonly called First Motion has been granted.
After passing of first motion, parties are called upon to wait for six months period before moving Petition for second motion. This period is extendible unto eighteen months. This six months period in mutual consent divorce is generally called cooling-off period. Six months period are given to parties to think over their relationship again. It is given for reconciliation.
After six months period, if parties have been unable to resolve their differences, they will have to appear in the Court again. Statement of parties would be recorded again.
During the period of six months i.e. before moving second motion, both parties have liberty to withdraw their consent for divorce.
After this Court passes an order dissolving the marriage by granting decree of divorce and thereby marriage stands dissolved.

*DIVORCE LAWS

vary from religion to religion in a country with a rich cultural diversity like India. Hindus(which includes Sikh, Jain, Budh) are governed by Hindu Marriage Act,1955. Christians are governed by Indian Divorce Act-1869 & The Indian Christian Marriage Act,1872. Muslims are governed by Personnel laws of Divorce and also the Dissolution of Marriage Act,1939 & The Muslim Women(Protection of Rights on Divorce) Act,1986. Similarly, Parsis are governed by The Parsi Marriage & Divorce Act-1936. And there is also a secular law called Special Marriage Act,1954. A cursory reading of the entire gamut of Indian Laws regarding Divorce makes it clear broadly that the Divorce can be obtained by two ways:

1. Divorce by Mutual Consent

Mutual Consent Divorce is a simple way of coming out of the marriage and dissolves it legally. An important requirement is the mutual consent of the husband & wife. There are two aspects on which Husband & Wife are required to reach a consensus. One is the alimony or maintenance issues. As per Law, there is no minimum or maximum limit of maintenance. It could be any figure or no figure. Next important consideration is the Child Custody. This can also be worked out effectively between the parties. Child Custody in Mutual Consent Divorce can be shared or joint or exclusive depending upon the understanding of the spouses. Duration of Divorce in Mutual Consent varies from one month to six months or more from States to States and as per the High Court directions.

2. Contested Divorce

As the name suggests, you will have to contest it. Indian laws, in general, recognizes cruelty (Physical & Mental), Desertion (Period varies from 2 to 3 years), Unsoundness of mind( of Incurable form), Impotency, renouncing the world, etc. The aggrieved party has to take one of the above grounds for divorce and will have to file the case in the Court of appropriate jurisdiction. Party which files the case has to prove the case with the support of evidence and documents. On successfully proving the case, divorce will be granted and divorce decree will be drawn up accordingly.

ANNULMENT OF MARRIAGE:

Marriage in India can also be dissolved by means of Annulment. Procedure for annulment is same as that of Divorce except that the grounds for annulment are different than that of divorce. Grounds for annulment are fraud, pregnancy of wife by a person other than the husband, impotency prior to the marriage and subsist even at the time of filing the case. Once an annulment is granted by the Indian Court, the status of the parties remains as it was prior to the marriage.

VOID MARRIAGE:

There are certain forms of marriages which are null and void despite the performance /solemnization of the same. Marriage is void under following circumstances:-

a) neither party has a spouse living at the time of the marriage

b) the parties are not within the degrees of prohibited relationship, unless the custom or usage governing each of them permits of a marriage between the two;

c) the parties are not sapindas of each other unless the custom or usage governing each of them permits of a marriage between the two.

The time duration for obtaining divorce varies from case to case & place to place. Generally speaking, contested divorce proceedings take approximately 18 to 24 months. Mutual Consent Divorce varies from 4 weeks to 7 months and more. In Delhi, Mutual Consent Divorce is possible within two to four weeks. Generally speaking procedure for obtaining Divorce in all forms of law (based on religion) is same with only a mild variation.
For More information please contact us:

Consultants for Housing Co-operative Society in Pune
Ved Legal
Email: [email protected] / [email protected]
Mobile: +91 9763040088

*DIVORCE BY MUTUAL CONSENT

Mutual Consent Divorce was brought by the India Parliament vide Amendment in the year 1976 in the Hindu Marriage Act.
Divorce by Mutual Consent means when both Husband and wife has agreed amicably amongst themselves that they cannot live together anymore and that the best solution is to Divorce, without putting forth any allegations against each other, in the court of law, than such a Divorce petition presented jointly before the honorably court, is known as mutual consent Divorce.
It is the quickest form of divorce in India. The Conditions required under Section 13B of the Hindu Marriage Act are as follows:
(i) Husband and wife have been living separately for a period of one year or more,
(ii) That they are unable to live together,
(iii) And that both husband and wife have mutually agreed that the marriage has totally collapsed, hence marriage should be dissolved.

As per law, duration/time of obtaining mutual consent divorce is six months. Although, parties have option of filing the second motion petition any time between six months and eighteen months from the date of the filing of the Mutual Consent Divorce Petition.

PETITION FOR MUTUAL CONSENT DIVORCE CAN BE FILED AT ANY OF THE FOLLOWING PLACE:-
• Place where marriage had taken place
• Place where husband and wife last resided together.
• Place where wife is residing at the time of filing of the Petition

Once petition for divorce by mutual consent is filed, party’s presences are required in the Court for recording of the statement. In the event one of the party is unable to come, such party can appear through power of attorney. Such power of attorney preferably should be a family member of the spouse. Once statement is recorded, it is commonly called First Motion has been granted.
After passing of first motion, parties are called upon to wait for six months period before moving Petition for second motion. This period is extendible unto eighteen months. This six months period in mutual consent divorce is generally called cooling-off period. Six months period are given to parties to think their relationship again. It is given for reconciliation.
After six months period, if parties have been unable to resolve their differences, they will have to appear in the Court again. Statement of parties would be recorded again.
During the period of six months i.e. before moving second motion, both parties have liberty to withdraw their consent for divorce.
After this Court passes an order dissolving the marriage by granting decree of divorce and thereby marriage stands dissolved.

ADVANTAGES OF MUTUAL DIVORCE
Divorce by Mutual consent saves time, money and energy for both, Leaves no room for unnecessary quarrel.

By |November 1st, 2017|Advocate For Divorce In Pune|0 Comments

Advocate For Divorce In Pune

Divorce under Hindu Marriage Act

Under the old Hindu laws, divorce was viewed as forbidden and was not talked about as freely as it is spoken out today, but with the codification of the laws the provision of divorce were laid down The provision of “Divorce” has been dealt with under the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955 as being a true blue method whereby both the parties to the marriage, decide to break all the promises or vows taken at the time of marriage. All Hindus, Buddhist, Jains or Sikhs are covered under the divorce provisions of the act.

Grounds for Divorce
The following grounds can be invoked for securing a divorce under the act:

Adultery: During the period of marriage, if either spouse maintains sexual relations with a person other than his or her lawfully wedded companion.
1. Cruelty: After the marriage, subjecting the petitioner to cruelty.
2. Desertion: If either one of the parties to the marriage deserts the other for a consistent span of at least two years , prior to the filing of the petition by the other party.
3. Conversion to another religion by either party other than Hinduism
4. Mental Disorder: If the spouse of the petitioner suffers from any unsoundness of mind, mental illness or disorder that cannot be cured, then the petitioner can file for divorce
5. Virulent and Incurable Disease: in the form of leprosy.
6. Venerable Disease in Communicable form.
7. The renunciation of the world or entered any religious order.
8. Not heard being alive for a period of seven years or more.

Additional Grounds for Dissolution of the Marriage by the Wife
Under the act, the wife is entitled to seek divorce from her husband on the following grounds:
1. Where the husband has another living wife from his previous subsisting marriage, before the commencement of the act.
2. Post the marriage, the husband was found guilty of rape, sodomy or bestiality.
3. Where the wife was awarded an order or decree for maintenance under section 18 of the Hindu Adoption and Maintenance Act, 1956 or under section 125 of the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1975, by the court, in spite of the fact that she was living apart from her husband even before the passage of such decree or order. The conjugal relations between the parties failed to resume within one year or more, even after the passage of this order.
4. The marriage was performed before the attainment of 15 years of age by the wife, and on completion of 15 years and not before 18 years of age, the wife rejected the marriage Under the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955, a divorce petition can be filed by the parties only after the passage of one year from the marriage date.

The Irretrievable breakdown of Marriage
The Marriage Laws (Amendment) Bill, 2010 incorporated another ground for seeking divorce, namely the ‘Irretrievable breakdown of marriage’ under the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955 and the Special Marriage Act, 1954. As the term suggests, it leads to a situation whereby, either or both the parties to the marriage fine it impossible to peacefully cohabit with each other, due to personality’s clashes, differences in opinion and have lived separately from each other for a long period of time and are no longer too eager to further carry on their matrimonial relationship.

Section 13B in the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955
*13B DIVORCE BY MUTUAL CONSENT —

(1) Subject to the provisions of this Act a petition for dissolution of marriage by a decree of divorce may be presented to the district court by both the parties to a marriage together, whether such marriage was solemnized before or after the commencement of the Marriage Laws (Amendment) Act, 1976 (68 of 1976)*, on the ground that they have been living separately for a period of one year or more, that they have not been able to live together and that they have mutually agreed that the marriage should be dissolved.

(2) On the motion of both the parties made not earlier than six months after the date of the presentation of the petition referred to in sub-section (1) and not later than eighteen months after the said date, if the petition is not withdrawn in the meantime, the court shall, on being satisfied, after hearing the parties and after making such inquiry as it thinks fit, that a marriage has been solemnized and that the averments in the petition are true, pass a decree of divorce declaring the marriage to be dissolved with effect from the date of the decree.]

(i) The period of 6 to 18 months provided in section 13B is a period of interregnum which is intended to give time and opportunity to the parties to reflect on their move. In this transitional period the parties or either of them may have second thoughts; Suman v. Surendra Kumar, AIR 2003 Raj 155.

(ii) The period of living separately for one year must be immediately preceding the presentation of petition. The expression ‘living separately’ connotes not living like husband and wife. It has no reference to the place of living. The parties may live under the same roof and yet they may not be living as husband and wife. The parties should have no desire to perform marital obligations; Sureshta Devi v. Om Prakash, AIR 1992 SC 1904.

(iii) The period of six to eighteen months time is given in divorce by mutual consent as to give time and opportunity to the parties to reflect on their move and seek advice from relations and friends. Mutual consent should continue till the divorce decree is passed. The court should be satisfied about the bona fides and consent of the parties. If there is no consent at the time of enquiry the court gets no jurisdiction to make a decree for divorce. If the court is held to have the power to make a decree solely based on the initial petition, it negates the whole idea of mutuality. There can be unilateral withdrawal of consent. Held, that since consent of the wife was obtained by fraud and wife was not willing to consent, there could be unilateral withdrawal, of consent; Sureshta Devi v. Om Prakash, AIR 1992 SC 1904.

*PROCEDURE FOR MUTUAL CONSENT DIVORCE
Mutual Consent Divorce was brought by the India Parliament vide Amendment in the year 1976 in the Hindu Marriage Act.
As per law, duration/time of obtaining mutual consent divorce is six months. Although, parties have option of filing the second motion petition any time between six months and eighteen months from the date of the filing of the Mutual Consent Divorce Petition.
As a mutual consent divorce lawyers, we “VED LEGAL” provide platform to parties to discuss these issues in calm atmosphere and reach to their own solutions. We provide different options using our vast experience in the field to resolve issues affecting the chances of settlement.
Petition for mutual consent divorce can be filed at any of the following place:-

• Place where marriage had taken place
• Place where husband and wife last resided together.
• Place where wife is residing at the time of filing of the Petition

Once petition for divorce by mutual consent is filed, parties presence are required in the Court for recording of the statement. In the event one of the party is unable to come, such party can appear through power of attorney. Such power of attorney preferably should be a family member of the spouse. Once statement is recorded, it is commonly called First Motion has been granted.
After passing of first motion, parties are called upon to wait for six months period before moving Petition for second motion. This period is extendible unto eighteen months. This six months period in mutual consent divorce is generally called cooling-off period. Six months period are given to parties to think over their relationship again. It is given for reconciliation.
After six months period, if parties have been unable to resolve their differences, they will have to appear in the Court again. Statement of parties would be recorded again.

During the period of six months i.e. before moving second motion, both parties have liberty to withdraw their consent for divorce.
After this Court passes an order dissolving the marriage by granting decree of divorce and thereby marriage stands dissolved.

*DIVORCE LAWS

vary from religion to religion in a country with a rich cultural diversity like India. Hindus(which includes Sikh, Jain, Budh) are governed by Hindu Marriage Act,1955. Christians are governed by Indian Divorce Act-1869 & The Indian Christian Marriage Act,1872. Muslims are governed by Personnel laws of Divorce and also the Dissolution of Marriage Act,1939 & The Muslim Women(Protection of Rights on Divorce) Act,1986. Similarly, Parsis are governed by The Parsi Marriage & Divorce Act-1936. And there is also a secular law called Special Marriage Act,1954. A cursory reading of the entire gamut of Indian Laws regarding Divorce makes it clear broadly that the Divorce can be obtained by two ways:

1. Divorce by Mutual Consent

Mutual Consent Divorce is a simple way of coming out of the marriage and dissolves it legally. An important requirement is the mutual consent of the husband & wife. There are two aspects on which Husband & Wife are required to reach a consensus. One is the alimony or maintenance issues. As per Law, there is no minimum or maximum limit of maintenance. It could be any figure or no figure. Next important consideration is the Child Custody. This can also be worked out effectively between the parties. Child Custody in Mutual Consent Divorce can be shared or joint or exclusive depending upon the understanding of the spouses. Duration of Divorce in Mutual Consent varies from one month to six months or more from States to States and as per the High Court directions.

2. Contested Divorce

As the name suggests, you will have to contest it. Indian laws, in general, recognizes cruelty (Physical & Mental), Desertion (Period varies from 2 to 3 years), Unsoundness of mind( of Incurable form), Impotency, renouncing the world, etc. The aggrieved party has to take one of the above grounds for divorce and will have to file the case in the Court of appropriate jurisdiction. Party which files the case has to prove the case with the support of evidence and documents. On successfully proving the case, divorce will be granted and divorce decree will be drawn up accordingly.

ANNULMENT OF MARRIAGE:

Marriage in India can also be dissolved by means of Annulment. Procedure for annulment is same as that of Divorce except that the grounds for annulment are different than that of divorce. Grounds for annulment are fraud, pregnancy of wife by a person other than the husband, impotency prior to the marriage and subsist even at the time of filing the case. Once an annulment is granted by the Indian Court, the status of the parties remains as it was prior to the marriage.

VOID MARRIAGE:

There are certain forms of marriages which are null and void despite the performance /solemnization of the same. Marriage is void under following circumstances:-

a) neither party has a spouse living at the time of the marriage

b) the parties are not within the degrees of prohibited relationship, unless the custom or usage governing each of them permits of a marriage between the two;

c) the parties are not sapindas of each other unless the custom or usage governing each of them permits of a marriage between the two.

The time duration for obtaining divorce varies from case to case & place to place. Generally speaking, contested divorce proceedings take approximately 18 to 24 months. Mutual Consent Divorce varies from 4 weeks to 7 months and more. In Delhi, Mutual Consent Divorce is possible within two to four weeks. Generally speaking procedure for obtaining Divorce in all forms of law (based on religion) is same with only a mild variation.
For More information please contact us:

Consultants for Housing Co-operative Society in Pune
Ved Legal
Email: [email protected] / [email protected]
Mobile: +91 9763040088

*DIVORCE BY MUTUAL CONSENT

Mutual Consent Divorce was brought by the India Parliament vide Amendment in the year 1976 in the Hindu Marriage Act.
Divorce by Mutual Consent means when both Husband and wife has agreed amicably amongst themselves that they cannot live together anymore and that the best solution is to Divorce, without putting forth any allegations against each other, in the court of law, than such a Divorce petition presented jointly before the honorably court, is known as mutual consent Divorce.

It is the quickest form of divorce in India. The Conditions required under Section 13B of the Hindu Marriage Act are as follows:
(i) Husband and wife have been living separately for a period of one year or more,
(ii) That they are unable to live together,
(iii) And that both husband and wife have mutually agreed that the marriage has totally collapsed, hence marriage should be dissolved.

As per law, duration/time of obtaining mutual consent divorce is six months. Although, parties have option of filing the second motion petition any time between six months and eighteen months from the date of the filing of the Mutual Consent Divorce Petition.

PETITION FOR MUTUAL CONSENT DIVORCE CAN BE FILED AT ANY OF THE FOLLOWING PLACE:-
• Place where marriage had taken place
• Place where husband and wife last resided together.
• Place where wife is residing at the time of filing of the Petition

Once petition for divorce by mutual consent is filed, party’s presences are required in the Court for recording of the statement. In the event one of the party is unable to come, such party can appear through power of attorney. Such power of attorney preferably should be a family member of the spouse. Once statement is recorded, it is commonly called First Motion has been granted.
After passing of first motion, parties are called upon to wait for six months period before moving Petition for second motion. This period is extendible unto eighteen months. This six months period in mutual consent divorce is generally called cooling-off period. Six months period are given to parties to think their relationship again. It is given for reconciliation.
After six months period, if parties have been unable to resolve their differences, they will have to appear in the Court again. Statement of parties would be recorded again.

During the period of six months i.e. before moving second motion, both parties have liberty to withdraw their consent for divorce.
After this Court passes an order dissolving the marriage by granting decree of divorce and thereby marriage stands dissolved.

ADVANTAGES OF MUTUAL DIVORCE
Divorce by Mutual consent saves time, money and energy for both, Leaves no room for unnecessary quarrel.

By |October 28th, 2017|Advocate For Divorce In Pune|0 Comments

Advocate For Divorce In Pune

Divorce under Hindu Marriage Act

Under the old Hindu laws, divorce was viewed as forbidden and was not talked about as freely as it is spoken out today, but with the codification of the laws the provision of divorce were laid down The provision of “Divorce” has been dealt with under the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955 as being a true blue method whereby both the parties to the marriage, decide to break all the promises or vows taken at the time of marriage. All Hindus, Buddhist, Jains or Sikhs are covered under the divorce provisions of the act.

Grounds for Divorce
The following grounds can be invoked for securing a divorce under the act:

Adultery: During the period of marriage, if either spouse maintains sexual relations with a person other than his or her lawfully wedded companion.
1. Cruelty: After the marriage, subjecting the petitioner to cruelty.
2. Desertion: If either one of the parties to the marriage deserts the other for a consistent span of at least two years , prior to the filing of the petition by the other party.
3. Conversion to another religion by either party other than Hinduism
4. Mental Disorder: If the spouse of the petitioner suffers from any unsoundness of mind, mental illness or disorder that cannot be cured, then the petitioner can file for divorce
5. Virulent and Incurable Disease: in the form of leprosy.
6. Venerable Disease in Communicable form.
7. The renunciation of the world or entered any religious order.
8. Not heard being alive for a period of seven years or more.
Additional Grounds for Dissolution of the Marriage by the Wife
Under the act, the wife is entitled to seek divorce from her husband on the following grounds:
1. Where the husband has another living wife from his previous subsisting marriage, before the commencement of the act.
2. Post the marriage, the husband was found guilty of rape, sodomy or bestiality.
3. Where the wife was awarded an order or decree for maintenance under section 18 of the Hindu Adoption and Maintenance Act, 1956 or under section 125 of the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1975, by the court, in spite of the fact that she was living apart from her husband even before the passage of such decree or order. The conjugal relations between the parties failed to resume within one year or more, even after the passage of this order.
4. The marriage was performed before the attainment of 15 years of age by the wife, and on completion of 15 years and not before 18 years of age, the wife rejected the marriage Under the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955, a divorce petition can be filed by the parties only after the passage of one year from the marriage date.

The Irretrievable breakdown of Marriage
The Marriage Laws (Amendment) Bill, 2010 incorporated another ground for seeking divorce, namely the ‘Irretrievable breakdown of marriage’ under the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955 and the Special Marriage Act, 1954. As the term suggests, it leads to a situation whereby, either or both the parties to the marriage fine it impossible to peacefully cohabit with each other, due to personality’s clashes, differences in opinion and have lived separately from each other for a long period of time and are no longer too eager to further carry on their matrimonial relationship.

Section 13B in the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955
*13B DIVORCE BY MUTUAL CONSENT —

(1) Subject to the provisions of this Act a petition for dissolution of marriage by a decree of divorce may be presented to the district court by both the parties to a marriage together, whether such marriage was solemnized before or after the commencement of the Marriage Laws (Amendment) Act, 1976 (68 of 1976)*, on the ground that they have been living separately for a period of one year or more, that they have not been able to live together and that they have mutually agreed that the marriage should be dissolved.

(2) On the motion of both the parties made not earlier than six months after the date of the presentation of the petition referred to in sub-section (1) and not later than eighteen months after the said date, if the petition is not withdrawn in the meantime, the court shall, on being satisfied, after hearing the parties and after making such inquiry as it thinks fit, that a marriage has been solemnized and that the averments in the petition are true, pass a decree of divorce declaring the marriage to be dissolved with effect from the date of the decree.]

(i) The period of 6 to 18 months provided in section 13B is a period of interregnum which is intended to give time and opportunity to the parties to reflect on their move. In this transitional period the parties or either of them may have second thoughts; Suman v. Surendra Kumar, AIR 2003 Raj 155.

(ii) The period of living separately for one year must be immediately preceding the presentation of petition. The expression ‘living separately’ connotes not living like husband and wife. It has no reference to the place of living. The parties may live under the same roof and yet they may not be living as husband and wife. The parties should have no desire to perform marital obligations; Sureshta Devi v. Om Prakash, AIR 1992 SC 1904.

(iii) The period of six to eighteen months time is given in divorce by mutual consent as to give time and opportunity to the parties to reflect on their move and seek advice from relations and friends. Mutual consent should continue till the divorce decree is passed. The court should be satisfied about the bona fides and consent of the parties. If there is no consent at the time of enquiry the court gets no jurisdiction to make a decree for divorce. If the court is held to have the power to make a decree solely based on the initial petition, it negates the whole idea of mutuality. There can be unilateral withdrawal of consent. Held, that since consent of the wife was obtained by fraud and wife was not willing to consent, there could be unilateral withdrawal, of consent; Sureshta Devi v. Om Prakash, AIR 1992 SC 1904.

*PROCEDURE FOR MUTUAL CONSENT DIVORCE
Mutual Consent Divorce was brought by the India Parliament vide Amendment in the year 1976 in the Hindu Marriage Act.
As per law, duration/time of obtaining mutual consent divorce is six months. Although, parties have option of filing the second motion petition any time between six months and eighteen months from the date of the filing of the Mutual Consent Divorce Petition.
As a mutual consent divorce lawyers, we “VED LEGAL” provide platform to parties to discuss these issues in calm atmosphere and reach to their own solutions. We provide different options using our vast experience in the field to resolve issues affecting the chances of settlement.
Petition for mutual consent divorce can be filed at any of the following place:-

• Place where marriage had taken place
• Place where husband and wife last resided together.
• Place where wife is residing at the time of filing of the Petition

Once petition for divorce by mutual consent is filed, parties presence are required in the Court for recording of the statement. In the event one of the party is unable to come, such party can appear through power of attorney. Such power of attorney preferably should be a family member of the spouse. Once statement is recorded, it is commonly called First Motion has been granted.
After passing of first motion, parties are called upon to wait for six months period before moving Petition for second motion. This period is extendible unto eighteen months. This six months period in mutual consent divorce is generally called cooling-off period. Six months period are given to parties to think over their relationship again. It is given for reconciliation.
After six months period, if parties have been unable to resolve their differences, they will have to appear in the Court again. Statement of parties would be recorded again.

During the period of six months i.e. before moving second motion, both parties have liberty to withdraw their consent for divorce.
After this Court passes an order dissolving the marriage by granting decree of divorce and thereby marriage stands dissolved.

*DIVORCE LAWS

vary from religion to religion in a country with a rich cultural diversity like India. Hindus(which includes Sikh, Jain, Budh) are governed by Hindu Marriage Act,1955. Christians are governed by Indian Divorce Act-1869 & The Indian Christian Marriage Act,1872. Muslims are governed by Personnel laws of Divorce and also the Dissolution of Marriage Act,1939 & The Muslim Women(Protection of Rights on Divorce) Act,1986. Similarly, Parsis are governed by The Parsi Marriage & Divorce Act-1936. And there is also a secular law called Special Marriage Act,1954. A cursory reading of the entire gamut of Indian Laws regarding Divorce makes it clear broadly that the Divorce can be obtained by two ways:

1. Divorce by Mutual Consent

Mutual Consent Divorce is a simple way of coming out of the marriage and dissolves it legally. An important requirement is the mutual consent of the husband & wife. There are two aspects on which Husband & Wife are required to reach a consensus. One is the alimony or maintenance issues. As per Law, there is no minimum or maximum limit of maintenance. It could be any figure or no figure. Next important consideration is the Child Custody. This can also be worked out effectively between the parties. Child Custody in Mutual Consent Divorce can be shared or joint or exclusive depending upon the understanding of the spouses. Duration of Divorce in Mutual Consent varies from one month to six months or more from States to States and as per the High Court directions.

2. Contested Divorce

As the name suggests, you will have to contest it. Indian laws, in general, recognizes cruelty (Physical & Mental), Desertion (Period varies from 2 to 3 years), Unsoundness of mind( of Incurable form), Impotency, renouncing the world, etc. The aggrieved party has to take one of the above grounds for divorce and will have to file the case in the Court of appropriate jurisdiction. Party which files the case has to prove the case with the support of evidence and documents. On successfully proving the case, divorce will be granted and divorce decree will be drawn up accordingly.

ANNULMENT OF MARRIAGE:

Marriage in India can also be dissolved by means of Annulment. Procedure for annulment is same as that of Divorce except that the grounds for annulment are different than that of divorce. Grounds for annulment are fraud, pregnancy of wife by a person other than the husband, impotency prior to the marriage and subsist even at the time of filing the case. Once an annulment is granted by the Indian Court, the status of the parties remains as it was prior to the marriage.

VOID MARRIAGE:

There are certain forms of marriages which are null and void despite the performance /solemnization of the same. Marriage is void under following circumstances:-

a) neither party has a spouse living at the time of the marriage

b) the parties are not within the degrees of prohibited relationship, unless the custom or usage governing each of them permits of a marriage between the two;

c) the parties are not sapindas of each other unless the custom or usage governing each of them permits of a marriage between the two.

The time duration for obtaining divorce varies from case to case & place to place. Generally speaking, contested divorce proceedings take approximately 18 to 24 months. Mutual Consent Divorce varies from 4 weeks to 7 months and more. In Delhi, Mutual Consent Divorce is possible within two to four weeks. Generally speaking procedure for obtaining Divorce in all forms of law (based on religion) is same with only a mild variation.
For More information please contact us:

Consultants for Housing Co-operative Society in Pune
Ved Legal
Email: [email protected] / [email protected]
Mobile: +91 9763040088

*DIVORCE BY MUTUAL CONSENT

Mutual Consent Divorce was brought by the India Parliament vide Amendment in the year 1976 in the Hindu Marriage Act.
Divorce by Mutual Consent means when both Husband and wife has agreed amicably amongst themselves that they cannot live together anymore and that the best solution is to Divorce, without putting forth any allegations against each other, in the court of law, than such a Divorce petition presented jointly before the honorably court, is known as mutual consent Divorce.

It is the quickest form of divorce in India. The Conditions required under Section 13B of the Hindu Marriage Act are as follows:
(i) Husband and wife have been living separately for a period of one year or more,
(ii) That they are unable to live together,
(iii) And that both husband and wife have mutually agreed that the marriage has totally collapsed, hence marriage should be dissolved.

As per law, duration/time of obtaining mutual consent divorce is six months. Although, parties have option of filing the second motion petition any time between six months and eighteen months from the date of the filing of the Mutual Consent Divorce Petition.

PETITION FOR MUTUAL CONSENT DIVORCE CAN BE FILED AT ANY OF THE FOLLOWING PLACE:-
• Place where marriage had taken place
• Place where husband and wife last resided together.
• Place where wife is residing at the time of filing of the Petition

Once petition for divorce by mutual consent is filed, party’s presences are required in the Court for recording of the statement. In the event one of the party is unable to come, such party can appear through power of attorney. Such power of attorney preferably should be a family member of the spouse. Once statement is recorded, it is commonly called First Motion has been granted.
After passing of first motion, parties are called upon to wait for six months period before moving Petition for second motion. This period is extendible unto eighteen months. This six months period in mutual consent divorce is generally called cooling-off period. Six months period are given to parties to think their relationship again. It is given for reconciliation.
After six months period, if parties have been unable to resolve their differences, they will have to appear in the Court again. Statement of parties would be recorded again.

During the period of six months i.e. before moving second motion, both parties have liberty to withdraw their consent for divorce.
After this Court passes an order dissolving the marriage by granting decree of divorce and thereby marriage stands dissolved.

ADVANTAGES OF MUTUAL DIVORCE
Divorce by Mutual consent saves time, money and energy for both, Leaves no room for unnecessary quarrel.

By |October 27th, 2017|Advocate For Divorce In Pune|0 Comments

Advocate For Divorce In Pune

Divorce under Hindu Marriage Act

Under the old Hindu laws, divorce was viewed as forbidden and was not talked about as freely as it is spoken out today, but with the codification of the laws the provision of divorce were laid down The provision of “Divorce” has been dealt with under the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955 as being a true blue method whereby both the parties to the marriage, decide to break all the promises or vows taken at the time of marriage. All Hindus, Buddhist, Jains or Sikhs are covered under the divorce provisions of the act.

Grounds for Divorce
The following grounds can be invoked for securing a divorce under the act:

Adultery: During the period of marriage, if either spouse maintains sexual relations with a person other than his or her lawfully wedded companion.
1. Cruelty: After the marriage, subjecting the petitioner to cruelty.
2. Desertion: If either one of the parties to the marriage deserts the other for a consistent span of at least two years , prior to the filing of the petition by the other party.
3. Conversion to another religion by either party other than Hinduism
4. Mental Disorder: If the spouse of the petitioner suffers from any unsoundness of mind, mental illness or disorder that cannot be cured, then the petitioner can file for divorce
5. Virulent and Incurable Disease: in the form of leprosy.
6. Venerable Disease in Communicable form.
7. The renunciation of the world or entered any religious order.
8. Not heard being alive for a period of seven years or more.

Additional Grounds for Dissolution of the Marriage by the Wife
Under the act, the wife is entitled to seek divorce from her husband on the following grounds:
1. Where the husband has another living wife from his previous subsisting marriage, before the commencement of the act.
2. Post the marriage, the husband was found guilty of rape, sodomy or bestiality.
3. Where the wife was awarded an order or decree for maintenance under section 18 of the Hindu Adoption and Maintenance Act, 1956 or under section 125 of the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1975, by the court, in spite of the fact that she was living apart from her husband even before the passage of such decree or order. The conjugal relations between the parties failed to resume within one year or more, even after the passage of this order.
4. The marriage was performed before the attainment of 15 years of age by the wife, and on completion of 15 years and not before 18 years of age, the wife rejected the marriage Under the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955, a divorce petition can be filed by the parties only after the passage of one year from the marriage date.

The Irretrievable breakdown of Marriage
The Marriage Laws (Amendment) Bill, 2010 incorporated another ground for seeking divorce, namely the ‘Irretrievable breakdown of marriage’ under the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955 and the Special Marriage Act, 1954. As the term suggests, it leads to a situation whereby, either or both the parties to the marriage fine it impossible to peacefully cohabit with each other, due to personality’s clashes, differences in opinion and have lived separately from each other for a long period of time and are no longer too eager to further carry on their matrimonial relationship.

Section 13B in the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955
*13B DIVORCE BY MUTUAL CONSENT —

(1) Subject to the provisions of this Act a petition for dissolution of marriage by a decree of divorce may be presented to the district court by both the parties to a marriage together, whether such marriage was solemnized before or after the commencement of the Marriage Laws (Amendment) Act, 1976 (68 of 1976)*, on the ground that they have been living separately for a period of one year or more, that they have not been able to live together and that they have mutually agreed that the marriage should be dissolved.

(2) On the motion of both the parties made not earlier than six months after the date of the presentation of the petition referred to in sub-section (1) and not later than eighteen months after the said date, if the petition is not withdrawn in the meantime, the court shall, on being satisfied, after hearing the parties and after making such inquiry as it thinks fit, that a marriage has been solemnized and that the averments in the petition are true, pass a decree of divorce declaring the marriage to be dissolved with effect from the date of the decree.]

(i) The period of 6 to 18 months provided in section 13B is a period of interregnum which is intended to give time and opportunity to the parties to reflect on their move. In this transitional period the parties or either of them may have second thoughts; Suman v. Surendra Kumar, AIR 2003 Raj 155.

(ii) The period of living separately for one year must be immediately preceding the presentation of petition. The expression ‘living separately’ connotes not living like husband and wife. It has no reference to the place of living. The parties may live under the same roof and yet they may not be living as husband and wife. The parties should have no desire to perform marital obligations; Sureshta Devi v. Om Prakash, AIR 1992 SC 1904.

(iii) The period of six to eighteen months time is given in divorce by mutual consent as to give time and opportunity to the parties to reflect on their move and seek advice from relations and friends. Mutual consent should continue till the divorce decree is passed. The court should be satisfied about the bona fides and consent of the parties. If there is no consent at the time of enquiry the court gets no jurisdiction to make a decree for divorce. If the court is held to have the power to make a decree solely based on the initial petition, it negates the whole idea of mutuality. There can be unilateral withdrawal of consent. Held, that since consent of the wife was obtained by fraud and wife was not willing to consent, there could be unilateral withdrawal, of consent; Sureshta Devi v. Om Prakash, AIR 1992 SC 1904.

*PROCEDURE FOR MUTUAL CONSENT DIVORCE
Mutual Consent Divorce was brought by the India Parliament vide Amendment in the year 1976 in the Hindu Marriage Act.
As per law, duration/time of obtaining mutual consent divorce is six months. Although, parties have option of filing the second motion petition any time between six months and eighteen months from the date of the filing of the Mutual Consent Divorce Petition.

As a mutual consent divorce lawyers, we “VED LEGAL” provide platform to parties to discuss these issues in calm atmosphere and reach to their own solutions. We provide different options using our vast experience in the field to resolve issues affecting the chances of settlement.

Petition for mutual consent divorce can be filed at any of the following place:-
• Place where marriage had taken place
• Place where husband and wife last resided together.
• Place where wife is residing at the time of filing of the Petition
Once petition for divorce by mutual consent is filed, parties presence are required in the Court for recording of the statement. In the event one of the party is unable to come, such party can appear through power of attorney. Such power of attorney preferably should be a family member of the spouse. Once statement is recorded, it is commonly called First Motion has been granted.

After passing of first motion, parties are called upon to wait for six months period before moving Petition for second motion. This period is extendible unto eighteen months. This six months period in mutual consent divorce is generally called cooling-off period. Six months period are given to parties to think over their relationship again. It is given for reconciliation.

After six months period, if parties have been unable to resolve their differences, they will have to appear in the Court again. Statement of parties would be recorded again.
During the period of six months i.e. before moving second motion, both parties have liberty to withdraw their consent for divorce.
After this Court passes an order dissolving the marriage by granting decree of divorce and thereby marriage stands dissolved.

*DIVORCE LAWS

vary from religion to religion in a country with a rich cultural diversity like India. Hindus(which includes Sikh, Jain, Budh) are governed by Hindu Marriage Act,1955. Christians are governed by Indian Divorce Act-1869 & The Indian Christian Marriage Act,1872. Muslims are governed by Personnel laws of Divorce and also the Dissolution of Marriage Act,1939 & The Muslim Women(Protection of Rights on Divorce) Act,1986. Similarly, Parsis are governed by The Parsi Marriage & Divorce Act-1936. And there is also a secular law called Special Marriage Act,1954. A cursory reading of the entire gamut of Indian Laws regarding Divorce makes it clear broadly that the Divorce can be obtained by two ways:

1. Divorce by Mutual Consent

Mutual Consent Divorce is a simple way of coming out of the marriage and dissolves it legally. An important requirement is the mutual consent of the husband & wife. There are two aspects on which Husband & Wife are required to reach a consensus. One is the alimony or maintenance issues. As per Law, there is no minimum or maximum limit of maintenance. It could be any figure or no figure. Next important consideration is the Child Custody. This can also be worked out effectively between the parties. Child Custody in Mutual Consent Divorce can be shared or joint or exclusive depending upon the understanding of the spouses. Duration of Divorce in Mutual Consent varies from one month to six months or more from States to States and as per the High Court directions.

2. Contested Divorce

As the name suggests, you will have to contest it. Indian laws, in general, recognizes cruelty (Physical & Mental), Desertion (Period varies from 2 to 3 years), Unsoundness of mind( of Incurable form), Impotency, renouncing the world, etc. The aggrieved party has to take one of the above grounds for divorce and will have to file the case in the Court of appropriate jurisdiction. Party which files the case has to prove the case with the support of evidence and documents. On successfully proving the case, divorce will be granted and divorce decree will be drawn up accordingly.

ANNULMENT OF MARRIAGE:

Marriage in India can also be dissolved by means of Annulment. Procedure for annulment is same as that of Divorce except that the grounds for annulment are different than that of divorce. Grounds for annulment are fraud, pregnancy of wife by a person other than the husband, impotency prior to the marriage and subsist even at the time of filing the case. Once an annulment is granted by the Indian Court, the status of the parties remains as it was prior to the marriage.

VOID MARRIAGE:

There are certain forms of marriages which are null and void despite the performance /solemnization of the same. Marriage is void under following circumstances:-

a) neither party has a spouse living at the time of the marriage

b) the parties are not within the degrees of prohibited relationship, unless the custom or usage governing each of them permits of a marriage between the two;

c) the parties are not sapindas of each other unless the custom or usage governing each of them permits of a marriage between the two.

The time duration for obtaining divorce varies from case to case & place to place. Generally speaking, contested divorce proceedings take approximately 18 to 24 months. Mutual Consent Divorce varies from 4 weeks to 7 months and more. In Delhi, Mutual Consent Divorce is possible within two to four weeks. Generally speaking procedure for obtaining Divorce in all forms of law (based on religion) is same with only a mild variation.
For More information please contact us:

Consultants for Housing Co-operative Society in Pune
Ved Legal
Email: [email protected] / [email protected]
Mobile: +91 9763040088

*DIVORCE BY MUTUAL CONSENT

Mutual Consent Divorce was brought by the India Parliament vide Amendment in the year 1976 in the Hindu Marriage Act.
Divorce by Mutual Consent means when both Husband and wife has agreed amicably amongst themselves that they cannot live together anymore and that the best solution is to Divorce, without putting forth any allegations against each other, in the court of law, than such a Divorce petition presented jointly before the honorably court, is known as mutual consent Divorce.
It is the quickest form of divorce in India. The Conditions required under Section 13B of the Hindu Marriage Act are as follows:
(i) Husband and wife have been living separately for a period of one year or more,
(ii) That they are unable to live together,
(iii) And that both husband and wife have mutually agreed that the marriage has totally collapsed, hence marriage should be dissolved.

As per law, duration/time of obtaining mutual consent divorce is six months. Although, parties have option of filing the second motion petition any time between six months and eighteen months from the date of the filing of the Mutual Consent Divorce Petition.

PETITION FOR MUTUAL CONSENT DIVORCE CAN BE FILED AT ANY OF THE FOLLOWING PLACE:-
• Place where marriage had taken place
• Place where husband and wife last resided together.
• Place where wife is residing at the time of filing of the Petition

Once petition for divorce by mutual consent is filed, party’s presences are required in the Court for recording of the statement. In the event one of the party is unable to come, such party can appear through power of attorney. Such power of attorney preferably should be a family member of the spouse. Once statement is recorded, it is commonly called First Motion has been granted.

After passing of first motion, parties are called upon to wait for six months period before moving Petition for second motion. This period is extendible unto eighteen months. This six months period in mutual consent divorce is generally called cooling-off period. Six months period are given to parties to think their relationship again. It is given for reconciliation.

After six months period, if parties have been unable to resolve their differences, they will have to appear in the Court again. Statement of parties would be recorded again.
During the period of six months i.e. before moving second motion, both parties have liberty to withdraw their consent for divorce.
After this Court passes an order dissolving the marriage by granting decree of divorce and thereby marriage stands dissolved.

ADVANTAGES OF MUTUAL DIVORCE
Divorce by Mutual consent saves time, money and energy for both, Leaves no room for unnecessary quarrel.

By |October 14th, 2017|Advocate For Divorce In Pune|0 Comments

Advocate For Divorce In Pune

Divorce under Hindu Marriage Act

Under the old Hindu laws, divorce was viewed as forbidden and was not talked about as freely as it is spoken out today, but with the codification of the laws the provision of divorce were laid down The provision of “Divorce” has been dealt with under the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955 as being a true blue method whereby both the parties to the marriage, decide to break all the promises or vows taken at the time of marriage. All Hindus, Buddhist, Jains or Sikhs are covered under the divorce provisions of the act.

Grounds for Divorce
The following grounds can be invoked for securing a divorce under the act:

Adultery: During the period of marriage, if either spouse maintains sexual relations with a person other than his or her lawfully wedded companion.
1. Cruelty: After the marriage, subjecting the petitioner to cruelty.
2. Desertion: If either one of the parties to the marriage deserts the other for a consistent span of at least two years , prior to the filing of the petition by the other party.
3. Conversion to another religion by either party other than Hinduism
4. Mental Disorder: If the spouse of the petitioner suffers from any unsoundness of mind, mental illness or disorder that cannot be cured, then the petitioner can file for divorce
5. Virulent and Incurable Disease: in the form of leprosy.
6. Venerable Disease in Communicable form.
7. The renunciation of the world or entered any religious order.
8. Not heard being alive for a period of seven years or more.

Additional Grounds for Dissolution of the Marriage by the Wife
Under the act, the wife is entitled to seek divorce from her husband on the following grounds:

1. Where the husband has another living wife from his previous subsisting marriage, before the commencement of the act.

2. Post the marriage, the husband was found guilty of rape, sodomy or bestiality.

3. Where the wife was awarded an order or decree for maintenance under section 18 of the Hindu Adoption and Maintenance Act, 1956 or under section 125 of the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1975, by the court, in spite of the fact that she was living apart from her husband even before the passage of such decree or order. The conjugal relations between the parties failed to resume within one year or more, even after the passage of this order.

4. The marriage was performed before the attainment of 15 years of age by the wife, and on completion of 15 years and not before 18 years of age, the wife rejected the marriage Under the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955, a divorce petition can be filed by the parties only after the passage of one year from the marriage date.

The Irretrievable breakdown of Marriage
The Marriage Laws (Amendment) Bill, 2010 incorporated another ground for seeking divorce, namely the ‘Irretrievable breakdown of marriage’ under the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955 and the Special Marriage Act, 1954. As the term suggests, it leads to a situation whereby, either or both the parties to the marriage fine it impossible to peacefully cohabit with each other, due to personality’s clashes, differences in opinion and have lived separately from each other for a long period of time and are no longer too eager to further carry on their matrimonial relationship.

Section 13B in the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955
*13B DIVORCE BY MUTUAL CONSENT —

(1) Subject to the provisions of this Act a petition for dissolution of marriage by a decree of divorce may be presented to the district court by both the parties to a marriage together, whether such marriage was solemnized before or after the commencement of the Marriage Laws (Amendment) Act, 1976 (68 of 1976)*, on the ground that they have been living separately for a period of one year or more, that they have not been able to live together and that they have mutually agreed that the marriage should be dissolved.

(2) On the motion of both the parties made not earlier than six months after the date of the presentation of the petition referred to in sub-section (1) and not later than eighteen months after the said date, if the petition is not withdrawn in the meantime, the court shall, on being satisfied, after hearing the parties and after making such inquiry as it thinks fit, that a marriage has been solemnized and that the averments in the petition are true, pass a decree of divorce declaring the marriage to be dissolved with effect from the date of the decree.]

(i) The period of 6 to 18 months provided in section 13B is a period of interregnum which is intended to give time and opportunity to the parties to reflect on their move. In this transitional period the parties or either of them may have second thoughts; Suman v. Surendra Kumar, AIR 2003 Raj 155.

(ii) The period of living separately for one year must be immediately preceding the presentation of petition. The expression ‘living separately’ connotes not living like husband and wife. It has no reference to the place of living. The parties may live under the same roof and yet they may not be living as husband and wife. The parties should have no desire to perform marital obligations; Sureshta Devi v. Om Prakash, AIR 1992 SC 1904.

(iii) The period of six to eighteen months time is given in divorce by mutual consent as to give time and opportunity to the parties to reflect on their move and seek advice from relations and friends. Mutual consent should continue till the divorce decree is passed. The court should be satisfied about the bona fides and consent of the parties. If there is no consent at the time of enquiry the court gets no jurisdiction to make a decree for divorce. If the court is held to have the power to make a decree solely based on the initial petition, it negates the whole idea of mutuality. There can be unilateral withdrawal of consent. Held, that since consent of the wife was obtained by fraud and wife was not willing to consent, there could be unilateral withdrawal, of consent; Sureshta Devi v. Om Prakash, AIR 1992 SC 1904.

*PROCEDURE FOR MUTUAL CONSENT DIVORCE
Mutual Consent Divorce was brought by the India Parliament vide Amendment in the year 1976 in the Hindu Marriage Act.
As per law, duration/time of obtaining mutual consent divorce is six months. Although, parties have option of filing the second motion petition any time between six months and eighteen months from the date of the filing of the Mutual Consent Divorce Petition.
As a mutual consent divorce lawyers, we “VED LEGAL” provide platform to parties to discuss these issues in calm atmosphere and reach to their own solutions. We provide different options using our vast experience in the field to resolve issues affecting the chances of settlement.

Petition for mutual consent divorce can be filed at any of the following place:-
• Place where marriage had taken place
• Place where husband and wife last resided together.
• Place where wife is residing at the time of filing of the Petition

Once petition for divorce by mutual consent is filed, parties presence are required in the Court for recording of the statement. In the event one of the party is unable to come, such party can appear through power of attorney. Such power of attorney preferably should be a family member of the spouse. Once statement is recorded, it is commonly called First Motion has been granted.

After passing of first motion, parties are called upon to wait for six months period before moving Petition for second motion. This period is extendible unto eighteen months. This six months period in mutual consent divorce is generally called cooling-off period. Six months period are given to parties to think over their relationship again. It is given for reconciliation.
After six months period, if parties have been unable to resolve their differences, they will have to appear in the Court again. Statement of parties would be recorded again.

During the period of six months i.e. before moving second motion, both parties have liberty to withdraw their consent for divorce.
After this Court passes an order dissolving the marriage by granting decree of divorce and thereby marriage stands dissolved.

*DIVORCE LAWS

vary from religion to religion in a country with a rich cultural diversity like India. Hindus(which includes Sikh, Jain, Budh) are governed by Hindu Marriage Act,1955. Christians are governed by Indian Divorce Act-1869 & The Indian Christian Marriage Act,1872. Muslims are governed by Personnel laws of Divorce and also the Dissolution of Marriage Act,1939 & The Muslim Women(Protection of Rights on Divorce) Act,1986. Similarly, Parsis are governed by The Parsi Marriage & Divorce Act-1936. And there is also a secular law called Special Marriage Act,1954. A cursory reading of the entire gamut of Indian Laws regarding Divorce makes it clear broadly that the Divorce can be obtained by two ways:

1. Divorce by Mutual Consent

Mutual Consent Divorce is a simple way of coming out of the marriage and dissolves it legally. An important requirement is the mutual consent of the husband & wife. There are two aspects on which Husband & Wife are required to reach a consensus. One is the alimony or maintenance issues. As per Law, there is no minimum or maximum limit of maintenance. It could be any figure or no figure. Next important consideration is the Child Custody. This can also be worked out effectively between the parties. Child Custody in Mutual Consent Divorce can be shared or joint or exclusive depending upon the understanding of the spouses. Duration of Divorce in Mutual Consent varies from one month to six months or more from States to States and as per the High Court directions.

2. Contested Divorce

As the name suggests, you will have to contest it. Indian laws, in general, recognizes cruelty (Physical & Mental), Desertion (Period varies from 2 to 3 years), Unsoundness of mind( of Incurable form), Impotency, renouncing the world, etc. The aggrieved party has to take one of the above grounds for divorce and will have to file the case in the Court of appropriate jurisdiction. Party which files the case has to prove the case with the support of evidence and documents. On successfully proving the case, divorce will be granted and divorce decree will be drawn up accordingly.

ANNULMENT OF MARRIAGE:

Marriage in India can also be dissolved by means of Annulment. Procedure for annulment is same as that of Divorce except that the grounds for annulment are different than that of divorce. Grounds for annulment are fraud, pregnancy of wife by a person other than the husband, impotency prior to the marriage and subsist even at the time of filing the case. Once an annulment is granted by the Indian Court, the status of the parties remains as it was prior to the marriage.

VOID MARRIAGE:

There are certain forms of marriages which are null and void despite the performance /solemnization of the same. Marriage is void under following circumstances:-

a) neither party has a spouse living at the time of the marriage

b) the parties are not within the degrees of prohibited relationship, unless the custom or usage governing each of them permits of a marriage between the two;

c) the parties are not sapindas of each other unless the custom or usage governing each of them permits of a marriage between the two.

The time duration for obtaining divorce varies from case to case & place to place. Generally speaking, contested divorce proceedings take approximately 18 to 24 months. Mutual Consent Divorce varies from 4 weeks to 7 months and more. In Delhi, Mutual Consent Divorce is possible within two to four weeks. Generally speaking procedure for obtaining Divorce in all forms of law (based on religion) is same with only a mild variation.
For More information please contact us:

Consultants for Housing Co-operative Society in Pune
Ved Legal
Email: [email protected] / [email protected]
Mobile: +91 9763040088

*DIVORCE BY MUTUAL CONSENT

Mutual Consent Divorce was brought by the India Parliament vide Amendment in the year 1976 in the Hindu Marriage Act.
Divorce by Mutual Consent means when both Husband and wife has agreed amicably amongst themselves that they cannot live together anymore and that the best solution is to Divorce, without putting forth any allegations against each other, in the court of law, than such a Divorce petition presented jointly before the honorably court, is known as mutual consent Divorce.
It is the quickest form of divorce in India. The Conditions required under Section 13B of the Hindu Marriage Act are as follows:
(i) Husband and wife have been living separately for a period of one year or more,
(ii) That they are unable to live together,
(iii) And that both husband and wife have mutually agreed that the marriage has totally collapsed, hence marriage should be dissolved.

As per law, duration/time of obtaining mutual consent divorce is six months. Although, parties have option of filing the second motion petition any time between six months and eighteen months from the date of the filing of the Mutual Consent Divorce Petition.

PETITION FOR MUTUAL CONSENT DIVORCE CAN BE FILED AT ANY OF THE FOLLOWING PLACE:-
• Place where marriage had taken place
• Place where husband and wife last resided together.
• Place where wife is residing at the time of filing of the Petition

Once petition for divorce by mutual consent is filed, party’s presences are required in the Court for recording of the statement. In the event one of the party is unable to come, such party can appear through power of attorney. Such power of attorney preferably should be a family member of the spouse. Once statement is recorded, it is commonly called First Motion has been granted.
After passing of first motion, parties are called upon to wait for six months period before moving Petition for second motion. This period is extendible unto eighteen months. This six months period in mutual consent divorce is generally called cooling-off period. Six months period are given to parties to think their relationship again. It is given for reconciliation.
After six months period, if parties have been unable to resolve their differences, they will have to appear in the Court again. Statement of parties would be recorded again.

During the period of six months i.e. before moving second motion, both parties have liberty to withdraw their consent for divorce.
After this Court passes an order dissolving the marriage by granting decree of divorce and thereby marriage stands dissolved.

ADVANTAGES OF MUTUAL DIVORCE
Divorce by Mutual consent saves time, money and energy for both, Leaves no room for unnecessary quarrel.

By |October 12th, 2017|Advocate For Divorce In Pune|0 Comments

Advocate For Divorce In Pune

Divorce under Hindu Marriage Act

Under the old Hindu laws, divorce was viewed as forbidden and was not talked about as freely as it is spoken out today, but with the codification of the laws the provision of divorce were laid down The provision of “Divorce” has been dealt with under the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955 as being a true blue method whereby both the parties to the marriage, decide to break all the promises or vows taken at the time of marriage. All Hindus, Buddhist, Jains or Sikhs are covered under the divorce provisions of the act.

Grounds for Divorce
The following grounds can be invoked for securing a divorce under the act:

Adultery: During the period of marriage, if either spouse maintains sexual relations with a person other than his or her lawfully wedded companion.
1. Cruelty: After the marriage, subjecting the petitioner to cruelty.
2. Desertion: If either one of the parties to the marriage deserts the other for a consistent span of at least two years , prior to the filing of the petition by the other party.
3. Conversion to another religion by either party other than Hinduism
4. Mental Disorder: If the spouse of the petitioner suffers from any unsoundness of mind, mental illness or disorder that cannot be cured, then the petitioner can file for divorce
5. Virulent and Incurable Disease: in the form of leprosy.
6. Venerable Disease in Communicable form.
7. The renunciation of the world or entered any religious order.
8. Not heard being alive for a period of seven years or more.
Additional Grounds for Dissolution of the Marriage by the Wife
Under the act, the wife is entitled to seek divorce from her husband on the following grounds:
1. Where the husband has another living wife from his previous subsisting marriage, before the commencement of the act.
2. Post the marriage, the husband was found guilty of rape, sodomy or bestiality.
3. Where the wife was awarded an order or decree for maintenance under section 18 of the Hindu Adoption and Maintenance Act, 1956 or under section 125 of the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1975, by the court, in spite of the fact that she was living apart from her husband even before the passage of such decree or order. The conjugal relations between the parties failed to resume within one year or more, even after the passage of this order.
4. The marriage was performed before the attainment of 15 years of age by the wife, and on completion of 15 years and not before 18 years of age, the wife rejected the marriage Under the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955, a divorce petition can be filed by the parties only after the passage of one year from the marriage date.

The Irretrievable breakdown of Marriage
The Marriage Laws (Amendment) Bill, 2010 incorporated another ground for seeking divorce, namely the ‘Irretrievable breakdown of marriage’ under the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955 and the Special Marriage Act, 1954. As the term suggests, it leads to a situation whereby, either or both the parties to the marriage fine it impossible to peacefully cohabit with each other, due to personality’s clashes, differences in opinion and have lived separately from each other for a long period of time and are no longer too eager to further carry on their matrimonial relationship.

Section 13B in the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955
*13B DIVORCE BY MUTUAL CONSENT —

(1) Subject to the provisions of this Act a petition for dissolution of marriage by a decree of divorce may be presented to the district court by both the parties to a marriage together, whether such marriage was solemnized before or after the commencement of the Marriage Laws (Amendment) Act, 1976 (68 of 1976)*, on the ground that they have been living separately for a period of one year or more, that they have not been able to live together and that they have mutually agreed that the marriage should be dissolved.

(2) On the motion of both the parties made not earlier than six months after the date of the presentation of the petition referred to in sub-section (1) and not later than eighteen months after the said date, if the petition is not withdrawn in the meantime, the court shall, on being satisfied, after hearing the parties and after making such inquiry as it thinks fit, that a marriage has been solemnized and that the averments in the petition are true, pass a decree of divorce declaring the marriage to be dissolved with effect from the date of the decree.]

(i) The period of 6 to 18 months provided in section 13B is a period of interregnum which is intended to give time and opportunity to the parties to reflect on their move. In this transitional period the parties or either of them may have second thoughts; Suman v. Surendra Kumar, AIR 2003 Raj 155.

(ii) The period of living separately for one year must be immediately preceding the presentation of petition. The expression ‘living separately’ connotes not living like husband and wife. It has no reference to the place of living. The parties may live under the same roof and yet they may not be living as husband and wife. The parties should have no desire to perform marital obligations; Sureshta Devi v. Om Prakash, AIR 1992 SC 1904.

(iii) The period of six to eighteen months time is given in divorce by mutual consent as to give time and opportunity to the parties to reflect on their move and seek advice from relations and friends. Mutual consent should continue till the divorce decree is passed. The court should be satisfied about the bona fides and consent of the parties. If there is no consent at the time of enquiry the court gets no jurisdiction to make a decree for divorce. If the court is held to have the power to make a decree solely based on the initial petition, it negates the whole idea of mutuality. There can be unilateral withdrawal of consent. Held, that since consent of the wife was obtained by fraud and wife was not willing to consent, there could be unilateral withdrawal, of consent; Sureshta Devi v. Om Prakash, AIR 1992 SC 1904.

*PROCEDURE FOR MUTUAL CONSENT DIVORCE
Mutual Consent Divorce was brought by the India Parliament vide Amendment in the year 1976 in the Hindu Marriage Act.
As per law, duration/time of obtaining mutual consent divorce is six months. Although, parties have option of filing the second motion petition any time between six months and eighteen months from the date of the filing of the Mutual Consent Divorce Petition.
As a mutual consent divorce lawyers, we “VED LEGAL” provide platform to parties to discuss these issues in calm atmosphere and reach to their own solutions. We provide different options using our vast experience in the field to resolve issues affecting the chances of settlement.

Petition for mutual consent divorce can be filed at any of the following place:-
• Place where marriage had taken place
• Place where husband and wife last resided together.
• Place where wife is residing at the time of filing of the Petition

Once petition for divorce by mutual consent is filed, parties presence are required in the Court for recording of the statement. In the event one of the party is unable to come, such party can appear through power of attorney. Such power of attorney preferably should be a family member of the spouse. Once statement is recorded, it is commonly called First Motion has been granted.

After passing of first motion, parties are called upon to wait for six months period before moving Petition for second motion. This period is extendible unto eighteen months. This six months period in mutual consent divorce is generally called cooling-off period. Six months period are given to parties to think over their relationship again. It is given for reconciliation.
After six months period, if parties have been unable to resolve their differences, they will have to appear in the Court again. Statement of parties would be recorded again.

During the period of six months i.e. before moving second motion, both parties have liberty to withdraw their consent for divorce.
After this Court passes an order dissolving the marriage by granting decree of divorce and thereby marriage stands dissolved.

*DIVORCE LAWS

vary from religion to religion in a country with a rich cultural diversity like India. Hindus(which includes Sikh, Jain, Budh) are governed by Hindu Marriage Act,1955. Christians are governed by Indian Divorce Act-1869 & The Indian Christian Marriage Act,1872. Muslims are governed by Personnel laws of Divorce and also the Dissolution of Marriage Act,1939 & The Muslim Women(Protection of Rights on Divorce) Act,1986. Similarly, Parsis are governed by The Parsi Marriage & Divorce Act-1936. And there is also a secular law called Special Marriage Act,1954. A cursory reading of the entire gamut of Indian Laws regarding Divorce makes it clear broadly that the Divorce can be obtained by two ways:

1. Divorce by Mutual Consent

Mutual Consent Divorce is a simple way of coming out of the marriage and dissolves it legally. An important requirement is the mutual consent of the husband & wife. There are two aspects on which Husband & Wife are required to reach a consensus. One is the alimony or maintenance issues. As per Law, there is no minimum or maximum limit of maintenance. It could be any figure or no figure. Next important consideration is the Child Custody. This can also be worked out effectively between the parties. Child Custody in Mutual Consent Divorce can be shared or joint or exclusive depending upon the understanding of the spouses. Duration of Divorce in Mutual Consent varies from one month to six months or more from States to States and as per the High Court directions.

2. Contested Divorce

As the name suggests, you will have to contest it. Indian laws, in general, recognizes cruelty (Physical & Mental), Desertion (Period varies from 2 to 3 years), Unsoundness of mind( of Incurable form), Impotency, renouncing the world, etc. The aggrieved party has to take one of the above grounds for divorce and will have to file the case in the Court of appropriate jurisdiction. Party which files the case has to prove the case with the support of evidence and documents. On successfully proving the case, divorce will be granted and divorce decree will be drawn up accordingly.

ANNULMENT OF MARRIAGE:

Marriage in India can also be dissolved by means of Annulment. Procedure for annulment is same as that of Divorce except that the grounds for annulment are different than that of divorce. Grounds for annulment are fraud, pregnancy of wife by a person other than the husband, impotency prior to the marriage and subsist even at the time of filing the case. Once an annulment is granted by the Indian Court, the status of the parties remains as it was prior to the marriage.

VOID MARRIAGE:

There are certain forms of marriages which are null and void despite the performance /solemnization of the same. Marriage is void under following circumstances:-

a) neither party has a spouse living at the time of the marriage

b) the parties are not within the degrees of prohibited relationship, unless the custom or usage governing each of them permits of a marriage between the two;

c) the parties are not sapindas of each other unless the custom or usage governing each of them permits of a marriage between the two.

The time duration for obtaining divorce varies from case to case & place to place. Generally speaking, contested divorce proceedings take approximately 18 to 24 months. Mutual Consent Divorce varies from 4 weeks to 7 months and more. In Delhi, Mutual Consent Divorce is possible within two to four weeks. Generally speaking procedure for obtaining Divorce in all forms of law (based on religion) is same with only a mild variation.
For More information please contact us:

Consultants for Housing Co-operative Society in Pune
Ved Legal
Email: [email protected] / [email protected]
Mobile: +91 9763040088

*DIVORCE BY MUTUAL CONSENT

Mutual Consent Divorce was brought by the India Parliament vide Amendment in the year 1976 in the Hindu Marriage Act.
Divorce by Mutual Consent means when both Husband and wife has agreed amicably amongst themselves that they cannot live together anymore and that the best solution is to Divorce, without putting forth any allegations against each other, in the court of law, than such a Divorce petition presented jointly before the honorably court, is known as mutual consent Divorce.

It is the quickest form of divorce in India. The Conditions required under Section 13B of the Hindu Marriage Act are as follows:
(i) Husband and wife have been living separately for a period of one year or more,
(ii) That they are unable to live together,
(iii) And that both husband and wife have mutually agreed that the marriage has totally collapsed, hence marriage should be dissolved.

As per law, duration/time of obtaining mutual consent divorce is six months. Although, parties have option of filing the second motion petition any time between six months and eighteen months from the date of the filing of the Mutual Consent Divorce Petition.

PETITION FOR MUTUAL CONSENT DIVORCE CAN BE FILED AT ANY OF THE FOLLOWING PLACE:-
• Place where marriage had taken place
• Place where husband and wife last resided together.
• Place where wife is residing at the time of filing of the Petition

Once petition for divorce by mutual consent is filed, party’s presences are required in the Court for recording of the statement. In the event one of the party is unable to come, such party can appear through power of attorney. Such power of attorney preferably should be a family member of the spouse. Once statement is recorded, it is commonly called First Motion has been granted.

After passing of first motion, parties are called upon to wait for six months period before moving Petition for second motion. This period is extendible unto eighteen months. This six months period in mutual consent divorce is generally called cooling-off period. Six months period are given to parties to think their relationship again. It is given for reconciliation.
After six months period, if parties have been unable to resolve their differences, they will have to appear in the Court again. Statement of parties would be recorded again.

During the period of six months i.e. before moving second motion, both parties have liberty to withdraw their consent for divorce.
After this Court passes an order dissolving the marriage by granting decree of divorce and thereby marriage stands dissolved.

ADVANTAGES OF MUTUAL DIVORCE
Divorce by Mutual consent saves time, money and energy for both, Leaves no room for unnecessary quarrel.

By |October 9th, 2017|Advocate For Divorce In Pune|0 Comments

Advocates For Divorce In Pune

Advocates For Divorce In Pune

Under the old Hindu laws, divorce was viewed as forbidden and was not talked about as freely as it is spoken out today, but with the codification of the laws the provision of divorce were laid down The provision of “Divorce” has been dealt with under the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955 as being a true blue method whereby both the parties to the marriage, decide to break all the promises or vows taken at the time of marriage. All Hindus, Buddhist, Jains or Sikhs are covered under the divorce provisions of the act.

Grounds for Divorce
The following grounds can be invoked for securing a divorce under the act:

Adultery: During the period of marriage, if either spouse maintains sexual relations with a person other than his or her lawfully wedded companion.
1. Cruelty: After the marriage, subjecting the petitioner to cruelty.
2. Desertion: If either one of the parties to the marriage deserts the other for a consistent span of at least two years , prior to the filing of the petition by the other party.
3. Conversion to another religion by either party other than Hinduism
4. Mental Disorder: If the spouse of the petitioner suffers from any unsoundness of mind, mental illness or disorder that cannot be cured, then the petitioner can file for divorce
5. Virulent and Incurable Disease: in the form of leprosy.
6. Venerable Disease in Communicable form.
7. The renunciation of the world or entered any religious order.
8. Not heard being alive for a period of seven years or more.
Additional Grounds for Dissolution of the Marriage by the Wife
Under the act, the wife is entitled to seek divorce from her husband on the following grounds:
1. Where the husband has another living wife from his previous subsisting marriage, before the commencement of the act.
2. Post the marriage, the husband was found guilty of rape, sodomy or bestiality.
3. Where the wife was awarded an order or decree for maintenance under section 18 of the Hindu Adoption and Maintenance Act, 1956 or under section 125 of the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1975, by the court, in spite of the fact that she was living apart from her husband even before the passage of such decree or order. The conjugal relations between the parties failed to resume within one year or more, even after the passage of this order.
4. The marriage was performed before the attainment of 15 years of age by the wife, and on completion of 15 years and not before 18 years of age, the wife rejected the marriage Under the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955, a divorce petition can be filed by the parties only after the passage of one year from the marriage date.

The Irretrievable breakdown of Marriage
The Marriage Laws (Amendment) Bill, 2010 incorporated another ground for seeking divorce, namely the ‘Irretrievable breakdown of marriage’ under the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955 and the Special Marriage Act, 1954. As the term suggests, it leads to a situation whereby, either or both the parties to the marriage fine it impossible to peacefully cohabit with each other, due to personality’s clashes, differences in opinion and have lived separately from each other for a long period of time and are no longer too eager to further carry on their matrimonial relationship.

Section 13B in the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955
*13B DIVORCE BY MUTUAL CONSENT —

(1) Subject to the provisions of this Act a petition for dissolution of marriage by a decree of divorce may be presented to the district court by both the parties to a marriage together, whether such marriage was solemnized before or after the commencement of the Marriage Laws (Amendment) Act, 1976 (68 of 1976)*, on the ground that they have been living separately for a period of one year or more, that they have not been able to live together and that they have mutually agreed that the marriage should be dissolved.

(2) On the motion of both the parties made not earlier than six months after the date of the presentation of the petition referred to in sub-section (1) and not later than eighteen months after the said date, if the petition is not withdrawn in the meantime, the court shall, on being satisfied, after hearing the parties and after making such inquiry as it thinks fit, that a marriage has been solemnized and that the averments in the petition are true, pass a decree of divorce declaring the marriage to be dissolved with effect from the date of the decree.]

(i) The period of 6 to 18 months provided in section 13B is a period of interregnum which is intended to give time and opportunity to the parties to reflect on their move. In this transitional period the parties or either of them may have second thoughts; Suman v. Surendra Kumar, AIR 2003 Raj 155.

(ii) The period of living separately for one year must be immediately preceding the presentation of petition. The expression ‘living separately’ connotes not living like husband and wife. It has no reference to the place of living. The parties may live under the same roof and yet they may not be living as husband and wife. The parties should have no desire to perform marital obligations; Sureshta Devi v. Om Prakash, AIR 1992 SC 1904.

(iii) The period of six to eighteen months time is given in divorce by mutual consent as to give time and opportunity to the parties to reflect on their move and seek advice from relations and friends. Mutual consent should continue till the divorce decree is passed. The court should be satisfied about the bona fides and consent of the parties. If there is no consent at the time of enquiry the court gets no jurisdiction to make a decree for divorce. If the court is held to have the power to make a decree solely based on the initial petition, it negates the whole idea of mutuality. There can be unilateral withdrawal of consent. Held, that since consent of the wife was obtained by fraud and wife was not willing to consent, there could be unilateral withdrawal, of consent; Sureshta Devi v. Om Prakash, AIR 1992 SC 1904.

By |October 6th, 2017|Advocate For Divorce In Pune|0 Comments

Advocate For Divorce In Pune

Divorce under Hindu Marriage Act

Under the old Hindu laws, divorce was viewed as forbidden and was not talked about as freely as it is spoken out today, but with the codification of the laws the provision of divorce were laid down The provision of “Divorce” has been dealt with under the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955 as being a true blue method whereby both the parties to the marriage, decide to break all the promises or vows taken at the time of marriage. All Hindus, Buddhist, Jains or Sikhs are covered under the divorce provisions of the act.

Grounds for Divorce
The following grounds can be invoked for securing a divorce under the act:

Adultery: During the period of marriage, if either spouse maintains sexual relations with a person other than his or her lawfully wedded companion.
1. Cruelty: After the marriage, subjecting the petitioner to cruelty.
2. Desertion: If either one of the parties to the marriage deserts the other for a consistent span of at least two years , prior to the filing of the petition by the other party.
3. Conversion to another religion by either party other than Hinduism
4. Mental Disorder: If the spouse of the petitioner suffers from any unsoundness of mind, mental illness or disorder that cannot be cured, then the petitioner can file for divorce
5. Virulent and Incurable Disease: in the form of leprosy.
6. Venerable Disease in Communicable form.
7. The renunciation of the world or entered any religious order.
8. Not heard being alive for a period of seven years or more.
Additional Grounds for Dissolution of the Marriage by the Wife
Under the act, the wife is entitled to seek divorce from her husband on the following grounds:
1. Where the husband has another living wife from his previous subsisting marriage, before the commencement of the act.
2. Post the marriage, the husband was found guilty of rape, sodomy or bestiality.
3. Where the wife was awarded an order or decree for maintenance under section 18 of the Hindu Adoption and Maintenance Act, 1956 or under section 125 of the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1975, by the court, in spite of the fact that she was living apart from her husband even before the passage of such decree or order. The conjugal relations between the parties failed to resume within one year or more, even after the passage of this order.
4. The marriage was performed before the attainment of 15 years of age by the wife, and on completion of 15 years and not before 18 years of age, the wife rejected the marriage Under the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955, a divorce petition can be filed by the parties only after the passage of one year from the marriage date.

The Irretrievable breakdown of Marriage
The Marriage Laws (Amendment) Bill, 2010 incorporated another ground for seeking divorce, namely the ‘Irretrievable breakdown of marriage’ under the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955 and the Special Marriage Act, 1954. As the term suggests, it leads to a situation whereby, either or both the parties to the marriage fine it impossible to peacefully cohabit with each other, due to personality’s clashes, differences in opinion and have lived separately from each other for a long period of time and are no longer too eager to further carry on their matrimonial relationship.

Section 13B in the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955
*13B DIVORCE BY MUTUAL CONSENT —

(1) Subject to the provisions of this Act a petition for dissolution of marriage by a decree of divorce may be presented to the district court by both the parties to a marriage together, whether such marriage was solemnized before or after the commencement of the Marriage Laws (Amendment) Act, 1976 (68 of 1976)*, on the ground that they have been living separately for a period of one year or more, that they have not been able to live together and that they have mutually agreed that the marriage should be dissolved.

(2) On the motion of both the parties made not earlier than six months after the date of the presentation of the petition referred to in sub-section (1) and not later than eighteen months after the said date, if the petition is not withdrawn in the meantime, the court shall, on being satisfied, after hearing the parties and after making such inquiry as it thinks fit, that a marriage has been solemnized and that the averments in the petition are true, pass a decree of divorce declaring the marriage to be dissolved with effect from the date of the decree.]

(i) The period of 6 to 18 months provided in section 13B is a period of interregnum which is intended to give time and opportunity to the parties to reflect on their move. In this transitional period the parties or either of them may have second thoughts; Suman v. Surendra Kumar, AIR 2003 Raj 155.

(ii) The period of living separately for one year must be immediately preceding the presentation of petition. The expression ‘living separately’ connotes not living like husband and wife. It has no reference to the place of living. The parties may live under the same roof and yet they may not be living as husband and wife. The parties should have no desire to perform marital obligations; Sureshta Devi v. Om Prakash, AIR 1992 SC 1904.

(iii) The period of six to eighteen months time is given in divorce by mutual consent as to give time and opportunity to the parties to reflect on their move and seek advice from relations and friends. Mutual consent should continue till the divorce decree is passed. The court should be satisfied about the bona fides and consent of the parties. If there is no consent at the time of enquiry the court gets no jurisdiction to make a decree for divorce. If the court is held to have the power to make a decree solely based on the initial petition, it negates the whole idea of mutuality. There can be unilateral withdrawal of consent. Held, that since consent of the wife was obtained by fraud and wife was not willing to consent, there could be unilateral withdrawal, of consent; Sureshta Devi v. Om Prakash, AIR 1992 SC 1904.

*PROCEDURE FOR MUTUAL CONSENT DIVORCE
Mutual Consent Divorce was brought by the India Parliament vide Amendment in the year 1976 in the Hindu Marriage Act.
As per law, duration/time of obtaining mutual consent divorce is six months. Although, parties have option of filing the second motion petition any time between six months and eighteen months from the date of the filing of the Mutual Consent Divorce Petition.
As a mutual consent divorce lawyers, we “VED LEGAL” provide platform to parties to discuss these issues in calm atmosphere and reach to their own solutions. We provide different options using our vast experience in the field to resolve issues affecting the chances of settlement.

Petition for mutual consent divorce can be filed at any of the following place:-
• Place where marriage had taken place
• Place where husband and wife last resided together.
• Place where wife is residing at the time of filing of the Petition

Once petition for divorce by mutual consent is filed, parties presence are required in the Court for recording of the statement. In the event one of the party is unable to come, such party can appear through power of attorney. Such power of attorney preferably should be a family member of the spouse. Once statement is recorded, it is commonly called First Motion has been granted.

After passing of first motion, parties are called upon to wait for six months period before moving Petition for second motion. This period is extendible unto eighteen months. This six months period in mutual consent divorce is generally called cooling-off period. Six months period are given to parties to think over their relationship again. It is given for reconciliation.
After six months period, if parties have been unable to resolve their differences, they will have to appear in the Court again. Statement of parties would be recorded again.

During the period of six months i.e. before moving second motion, both parties have liberty to withdraw their consent for divorce.
After this Court passes an order dissolving the marriage by granting decree of divorce and thereby marriage stands dissolved.

*DIVORCE LAWS

vary from religion to religion in a country with a rich cultural diversity like India. Hindus(which includes Sikh, Jain, Budh) are governed by Hindu Marriage Act,1955. Christians are governed by Indian Divorce Act-1869 & The Indian Christian Marriage Act,1872. Muslims are governed by Personnel laws of Divorce and also the Dissolution of Marriage Act,1939 & The Muslim Women(Protection of Rights on Divorce) Act,1986. Similarly, Parsis are governed by The Parsi Marriage & Divorce Act-1936. And there is also a secular law called Special Marriage Act,1954. A cursory reading of the entire gamut of Indian Laws regarding Divorce makes it clear broadly that the Divorce can be obtained by two ways:

1. Divorce by Mutual Consent

Mutual Consent Divorce is a simple way of coming out of the marriage and dissolves it legally. An important requirement is the mutual consent of the husband & wife. There are two aspects on which Husband & Wife are required to reach a consensus. One is the alimony or maintenance issues. As per Law, there is no minimum or maximum limit of maintenance. It could be any figure or no figure. Next important consideration is the Child Custody. This can also be worked out effectively between the parties. Child Custody in Mutual Consent Divorce can be shared or joint or exclusive depending upon the understanding of the spouses. Duration of Divorce in Mutual Consent varies from one month to six months or more from States to States and as per the High Court directions.

2. Contested Divorce

As the name suggests, you will have to contest it. Indian laws, in general, recognizes cruelty (Physical & Mental), Desertion (Period varies from 2 to 3 years), Unsoundness of mind( of Incurable form), Impotency, renouncing the world, etc. The aggrieved party has to take one of the above grounds for divorce and will have to file the case in the Court of appropriate jurisdiction. Party which files the case has to prove the case with the support of evidence and documents. On successfully proving the case, divorce will be granted and divorce decree will be drawn up accordingly.

ANNULMENT OF MARRIAGE:

Marriage in India can also be dissolved by means of Annulment. Procedure for annulment is same as that of Divorce except that the grounds for annulment are different than that of divorce. Grounds for annulment are fraud, pregnancy of wife by a person other than the husband, impotency prior to the marriage and subsist even at the time of filing the case. Once an annulment is granted by the Indian Court, the status of the parties remains as it was prior to the marriage.

VOID MARRIAGE:

There are certain forms of marriages which are null and void despite the performance /solemnization of the same. Marriage is void under following circumstances:-

a) neither party has a spouse living at the time of the marriage

b) the parties are not within the degrees of prohibited relationship, unless the custom or usage governing each of them permits of a marriage between the two;

c) the parties are not sapindas of each other unless the custom or usage governing each of them permits of a marriage between the two.

The time duration for obtaining divorce varies from case to case & place to place. Generally speaking, contested divorce proceedings take approximately 18 to 24 months. Mutual Consent Divorce varies from 4 weeks to 7 months and more. In Delhi, Mutual Consent Divorce is possible within two to four weeks. Generally speaking procedure for obtaining Divorce in all forms of law (based on religion) is same with only a mild variation.
For More information please contact us:

Consultants for Housing Co-operative Society in Pune
Ved Legal
Email: [email protected] / [email protected]
Mobile: +91 9763040088

*DIVORCE BY MUTUAL CONSENT

Mutual Consent Divorce was brought by the India Parliament vide Amendment in the year 1976 in the Hindu Marriage Act.
Divorce by Mutual Consent means when both Husband and wife has agreed amicably amongst themselves that they cannot live together anymore and that the best solution is to Divorce, without putting forth any allegations against each other, in the court of law, than such a Divorce petition presented jointly before the honorably court, is known as mutual consent Divorce.
It is the quickest form of divorce in India. The Conditions required under Section 13B of the Hindu Marriage Act are as follows:
(i) Husband and wife have been living separately for a period of one year or more,
(ii) That they are unable to live together,
(iii) And that both husband and wife have mutually agreed that the marriage has totally collapsed, hence marriage should be dissolved.

As per law, duration/time of obtaining mutual consent divorce is six months. Although, parties have option of filing the second motion petition any time between six months and eighteen months from the date of the filing of the Mutual Consent Divorce Petition.

PETITION FOR MUTUAL CONSENT DIVORCE CAN BE FILED AT ANY OF THE FOLLOWING PLACE:-
• Place where marriage had taken place
• Place where husband and wife last resided together.
• Place where wife is residing at the time of filing of the Petition

Once petition for divorce by mutual consent is filed, party’s presences are required in the Court for recording of the statement. In the event one of the party is unable to come, such party can appear through power of attorney. Such power of attorney preferably should be a family member of the spouse. Once statement is recorded, it is commonly called First Motion has been granted.

After passing of first motion, parties are called upon to wait for six months period before moving Petition for second motion. This period is extendible unto eighteen months. This six months period in mutual consent divorce is generally called cooling-off period. Six months period are given to parties to think their relationship again. It is given for reconciliation.
After six months period, if parties have been unable to resolve their differences, they will have to appear in the Court again. Statement of parties would be recorded again.

During the period of six months i.e. before moving second motion, both parties have liberty to withdraw their consent for divorce.
After this Court passes an order dissolving the marriage by granting decree of divorce and thereby marriage stands dissolved.

ADVANTAGES OF MUTUAL DIVORCE
Divorce by Mutual consent saves time, money and energy for both, Leaves no room for unnecessary quarrel.

By |October 3rd, 2017|Advocate For Divorce In Pune|0 Comments